[LincolnTalk] old timer

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[LincolnTalk] old timer

Nancy Bergen

I   have been reluctant to write about my thoughts on the new school building and how worried I am that the values that I have admired about Lincoln have changed.

My husband and I both grew up in Lincoln and are now both 71 so we are really old timers here. We are both very concerned about what Lincoln is becoming and hope that people understand how our parents and many others in that generation were involved and committed to making Lincoln become what it is today. Many people donated land to conservation or took less than market value for their property so Lincoln would remain open and rural. Some of us could be living high off the hog if our parents had just sold their property outright but we were taught to value the town also. That generation knew that in putting land into conservation that property values would go up and it would threaten Lincoln’s economic diversity. Much time and effort were spent in trying to keep Lincoln a diverse town.

I think of all that so many families gave up to keep Lincoln as it is today. It was not just value of their property but also in time because so many of them were totally committed to the town and those who lived here. I remember how many nights a week my parents went out to attend meetings about the town. It was not just the schools or just the library or just the infrastructure it was the town and how it would affect all the people in it. Town meeting was a place to hash out ideas and differences and to hear people and understand what the issues involved. I have been disturbed by talk of town meeting being a waste of time, an inconvenience or outdated. I remember going to town meeting at Bemis hall ,then the town hall, and sitting up in the balcony and learning about the issues as a very young child.

 Some change is inevitable over time in any town. I hope that here, when we make a change, we think about the history and those who worked so hard to make Lincoln what it is today. We can learn a lot from that.

Thanks for reading an old timer’s thoughts.

Nan Bergen

 


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Re: [LincolnTalk] old timer

Diana Abrashkin
Nancy, we are privileged to be able to read what you've written about how the wonderful Lincoln we knew got here. Mainly through the joyous sacrifices of people like your parents.

I hope it will serve as a challenge to the me-me-me focus of many newer arrivals in Town, to follow in your folks' footsteps and continue to conserve the natural treasures of our lands, and our high ideals.

Sincerely, Diana Abrashkin (resident since the '70s, when a bunch of wonderful things happened here, like Codman farm, the Conservation Commission, etc.)

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 1:51 PM Nancy Bergen <[hidden email]> wrote:

I   have been reluctant to write about my thoughts on the new school building and how worried I am that the values that I have admired about Lincoln have changed.

My husband and I both grew up in Lincoln and are now both 71 so we are really old timers here. We are both very concerned about what Lincoln is becoming and hope that people understand how our parents and many others in that generation were involved and committed to making Lincoln become what it is today. Many people donated land to conservation or took less than market value for their property so Lincoln would remain open and rural. Some of us could be living high off the hog if our parents had just sold their property outright but we were taught to value the town also. That generation knew that in putting land into conservation that property values would go up and it would threaten Lincoln’s economic diversity. Much time and effort were spent in trying to keep Lincoln a diverse town.

I think of all that so many families gave up to keep Lincoln as it is today. It was not just value of their property but also in time because so many of them were totally committed to the town and those who lived here. I remember how many nights a week my parents went out to attend meetings about the town. It was not just the schools or just the library or just the infrastructure it was the town and how it would affect all the people in it. Town meeting was a place to hash out ideas and differences and to hear people and understand what the issues involved. I have been disturbed by talk of town meeting being a waste of time, an inconvenience or outdated. I remember going to town meeting at Bemis hall ,then the town hall, and sitting up in the balcony and learning about the issues as a very young child.

 Some change is inevitable over time in any town. I hope that here, when we make a change, we think about the history and those who worked so hard to make Lincoln what it is today. We can learn a lot from that.

Thanks for reading an old timer’s thoughts.

Nan Bergen

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] old timer

Tricia Thornton-Wells
Diana,

I find your characterization extremely offensive and not based in reality.  As a family who just 3-1/2 years ago chose Lincoln (didn't merely "arrive" in town from another state) over surrounding areas because of its small-town, laid-back, rural and nature-conserving values, my husband Bryce and I have sought out and immersed ourselves into multiple different aspects of this wonderful town, including the Codman Community Farm, First Parish in Lincoln, as well as organizations that more directly benefit my kids, such as the Lincoln School Foundation, the Lincoln Parent Teacher Organization, the Lincoln Park & Recreation Dept (as a volunteer coach), the Lincoln-Sudbury Youth Baseball League (as a volunteer coach), and the Lincoln Youth Soccer organization.  Virtually every family I have met here in Lincoln, regardless of age, is highly engaged in this town in one way or the other, based on their passions, values, skills and interests.  We do Walk the Lincoln Way, whether you can see it or not.

Sincerely,
Tricia Thornton-Wells

On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 2:07 PM Diana Abrashkin <[hidden email]> wrote:
Nancy, we are privileged to be able to read what you've written about how the wonderful Lincoln we knew got here. Mainly through the joyous sacrifices of people like your parents.

I hope it will serve as a challenge to the me-me-me focus of many newer arrivals in Town, to follow in your folks' footsteps and continue to conserve the natural treasures of our lands, and our high ideals.

Sincerely, Diana Abrashkin (resident since the '70s, when a bunch of wonderful things happened here, like Codman farm, the Conservation Commission, etc.)

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 1:51 PM Nancy Bergen <[hidden email]> wrote:

I   have been reluctant to write about my thoughts on the new school building and how worried I am that the values that I have admired about Lincoln have changed.

My husband and I both grew up in Lincoln and are now both 71 so we are really old timers here. We are both very concerned about what Lincoln is becoming and hope that people understand how our parents and many others in that generation were involved and committed to making Lincoln become what it is today. Many people donated land to conservation or took less than market value for their property so Lincoln would remain open and rural. Some of us could be living high off the hog if our parents had just sold their property outright but we were taught to value the town also. That generation knew that in putting land into conservation that property values would go up and it would threaten Lincoln’s economic diversity. Much time and effort were spent in trying to keep Lincoln a diverse town.

I think of all that so many families gave up to keep Lincoln as it is today. It was not just value of their property but also in time because so many of them were totally committed to the town and those who lived here. I remember how many nights a week my parents went out to attend meetings about the town. It was not just the schools or just the library or just the infrastructure it was the town and how it would affect all the people in it. Town meeting was a place to hash out ideas and differences and to hear people and understand what the issues involved. I have been disturbed by talk of town meeting being a waste of time, an inconvenience or outdated. I remember going to town meeting at Bemis hall ,then the town hall, and sitting up in the balcony and learning about the issues as a very young child.

 Some change is inevitable over time in any town. I hope that here, when we make a change, we think about the history and those who worked so hard to make Lincoln what it is today. We can learn a lot from that.

Thanks for reading an old timer’s thoughts.

Nan Bergen

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] old timer

RAandBOB
I can understand why you are so upset when you are giving so much to the town. We in the nostalgic older generation often don’t know many younger people so we don’t see the ones who are so engaged. Personally, I  am a amazed that anyone in your age group has time to volunteer given the 24-7 demands of the working world today. So many younger people on the SBC contributed massive amounts of time. One of the great pleasures for me in being part of the SBC was getting to know people outside my age group. We older people need to recognize that, while communication modes are changing, many of the younger people here care just as deeply as we do about this town. They are picking up the baton we have passed. 

Ruth Ann

On Dec 5, 2018, at 2:40 PM, Tricia Thornton-Wells <[hidden email]> wrote:

Diana,

I find your characterization extremely offensive and not based in reality.  As a family who just 3-1/2 years ago chose Lincoln (didn't merely "arrive" in town from another state) over surrounding areas because of its small-town, laid-back, rural and nature-conserving values, my husband Bryce and I have sought out and immersed ourselves into multiple different aspects of this wonderful town, including the Codman Community Farm, First Parish in Lincoln, as well as organizations that more directly benefit my kids, such as the Lincoln School Foundation, the Lincoln Parent Teacher Organization, the Lincoln Park & Recreation Dept (as a volunteer coach), the Lincoln-Sudbury Youth Baseball League (as a volunteer coach), and the Lincoln Youth Soccer organization.  Virtually every family I have met here in Lincoln, regardless of age, is highly engaged in this town in one way or the other, based on their passions, values, skills and interests.  We do Walk the Lincoln Way, whether you can see it or not.

Sincerely,
Tricia Thornton-Wells

On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 2:07 PM Diana Abrashkin <[hidden email]> wrote:
Nancy, we are privileged to be able to read what you've written about how the wonderful Lincoln we knew got here. Mainly through the joyous sacrifices of people like your parents.

I hope it will serve as a challenge to the me-me-me focus of many newer arrivals in Town, to follow in your folks' footsteps and continue to conserve the natural treasures of our lands, and our high ideals.

Sincerely, Diana Abrashkin (resident since the '70s, when a bunch of wonderful things happened here, like Codman farm, the Conservation Commission, etc.)

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 1:51 PM Nancy Bergen <[hidden email]> wrote:

I   have been reluctant to write about my thoughts on the new school building and how worried I am that the values that I have admired about Lincoln have changed.

My husband and I both grew up in Lincoln and are now both 71 so we are really old timers here. We are both very concerned about what Lincoln is becoming and hope that people understand how our parents and many others in that generation were involved and committed to making Lincoln become what it is today. Many people donated land to conservation or took less than market value for their property so Lincoln would remain open and rural. Some of us could be living high off the hog if our parents had just sold their property outright but we were taught to value the town also. That generation knew that in putting land into conservation that property values would go up and it would threaten Lincoln’s economic diversity. Much time and effort were spent in trying to keep Lincoln a diverse town.

I think of all that so many families gave up to keep Lincoln as it is today. It was not just value of their property but also in time because so many of them were totally committed to the town and those who lived here. I remember how many nights a week my parents went out to attend meetings about the town. It was not just the schools or just the library or just the infrastructure it was the town and how it would affect all the people in it. Town meeting was a place to hash out ideas and differences and to hear people and understand what the issues involved. I have been disturbed by talk of town meeting being a waste of time, an inconvenience or outdated. I remember going to town meeting at Bemis hall ,then the town hall, and sitting up in the balcony and learning about the issues as a very young child.

 Some change is inevitable over time in any town. I hope that here, when we make a change, we think about the history and those who worked so hard to make Lincoln what it is today. We can learn a lot from that.

Thanks for reading an old timer’s thoughts.

Nan Bergen

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] old timer

Kathryn Anagnostakis
In reply to this post by Tricia Thornton-Wells


On Dec 5, 2018, at 2:40 PM, Tricia Thornton-Wells <[hidden email]> wrote:

Diana,

I find your characterization extremely offensive and not based in reality.  As a family who just 3-1/2 years ago chose Lincoln (didn't merely "arrive" in town from another state) over surrounding areas because of its small-town, laid-back, rural and nature-conserving values, my husband Bryce and I have sought out and immersed ourselves into multiple different aspects of this wonderful town, including the Codman Community Farm, First Parish in Lincoln, as well as organizations that more directly benefit my kids, such as the Lincoln School Foundation, the Lincoln Parent Teacher Organization, the Lincoln Park & Recreation Dept (as a volunteer coach), the Lincoln-Sudbury Youth Baseball League (as a volunteer coach), and the Lincoln Youth Soccer organization.  Virtually every family I have met here in Lincoln, regardless of age, is highly engaged in this town in one way or the other, based on their passions, values, skills and interests.  We do Walk the Lincoln Way, whether you can see it or not.

Sincerely,
Tricia Thornton-Wells

Agreed on all fronts. I’m trying to think if I know any families where at least one, if not both parents, have not volunteered for some lincoln group. Often they do it while working full time jobs. 








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Re: [LincolnTalk] old timer

Kathryn Anagnostakis
Well, that made no sense!

Lots of families I know volunteer for a Lincoln group, in fact often both parents volunteer.

Some even do it while also working full time.

Point is I don't see a lot of me me me in the parents I know and I think it's quite rude to label them that way without knowing them.

On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 8:14 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Dec 5, 2018, at 2:40 PM, Tricia Thornton-Wells <[hidden email]> wrote:

Diana,

I find your characterization extremely offensive and not based in reality.  As a family who just 3-1/2 years ago chose Lincoln (didn't merely "arrive" in town from another state) over surrounding areas because of its small-town, laid-back, rural and nature-conserving values, my husband Bryce and I have sought out and immersed ourselves into multiple different aspects of this wonderful town, including the Codman Community Farm, First Parish in Lincoln, as well as organizations that more directly benefit my kids, such as the Lincoln School Foundation, the Lincoln Parent Teacher Organization, the Lincoln Park & Recreation Dept (as a volunteer coach), the Lincoln-Sudbury Youth Baseball League (as a volunteer coach), and the Lincoln Youth Soccer organization.  Virtually every family I have met here in Lincoln, regardless of age, is highly engaged in this town in one way or the other, based on their passions, values, skills and interests.  We do Walk the Lincoln Way, whether you can see it or not.

Sincerely,
Tricia Thornton-Wells

Agreed on all fronts. I’m trying to think if I know any families where at least one, if not both parents, have not volunteered for some lincoln group. Often they do it while working full time jobs. 












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