[LincolnTalk] garden question

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[LincolnTalk] garden question

Debra Daugherty
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra

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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Rich Rosenbaum
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Debra Daugherty
Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a brown leaf with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these leaves--on the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas). Anyone recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies and the eggs/larvae?

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]> wrote:
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Debra Daugherty
Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a brown leaf with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these leaves--on the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas). Anyone recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies and the eggs/larvae?

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]> wrote:
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Claire Mount
What did you figure out?   it would conclude the inquiry.  thanks

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:55 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a brown leaf with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these leaves--on the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas). Anyone recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies and the eggs/larvae?

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]> wrote:
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
--
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Debra Daugherty
The insect is a candy-striped leafhopper (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphocephala_coccinea). The dots on the leaves are not eggs but puncture holes from sucking the sap. I don't see anything online saying that these bugs make the leaves turn brown (scorching). The wikipedia page indicates that they carry a bacterium Xylella fastidiosa that causes leaf scorch. Sounds worrying because the bacterium kills trees and is untreatable once a tree gets infected. However, I sprayed my plants repeatedly with Spinosad (Captain Jack's brand), and I have had only a very little browning of leaves since then, which is reassuring. Whatever is causing the browning in my perennial seems to be controlled by the spray.

I just went outside to look at my heliopsises and there were several leaf hoppers on them today, which means Spinosad is not super lethal. I was told it is "fast on, fast off". If you spray after dark, the bees and butterflies are not exposed until the next day at which time the Spinosad is already ineffective. More spraying as a consequence, but at least it's fairly benign. And so far seems effective enough.

Good luck with your plants!
Debra


--Debra

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:54 AM Claire Mount <[hidden email]> wrote:
What did you figure out?   it would conclude the inquiry.  thanks

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:55 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a brown leaf with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these leaves--on the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas). Anyone recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies and the eggs/larvae?

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]> wrote:
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
--
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Claire Mount
Thank you!  and good luck

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 10:37 AM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
The insect is a candy-striped leafhopper (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphocephala_coccinea). The dots on the leaves are not eggs but puncture holes from sucking the sap. I don't see anything online saying that these bugs make the leaves turn brown (scorching). The wikipedia page indicates that they carry a bacterium Xylella fastidiosa that causes leaf scorch. Sounds worrying because the bacterium kills trees and is untreatable once a tree gets infected. However, I sprayed my plants repeatedly with Spinosad (Captain Jack's brand), and I have had only a very little browning of leaves since then, which is reassuring. Whatever is causing the browning in my perennial seems to be controlled by the spray.

I just went outside to look at my heliopsises and there were several leaf hoppers on them today, which means Spinosad is not super lethal. I was told it is "fast on, fast off". If you spray after dark, the bees and butterflies are not exposed until the next day at which time the Spinosad is already ineffective. More spraying as a consequence, but at least it's fairly benign. And so far seems effective enough.

Good luck with your plants!
Debra


--Debra

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:54 AM Claire Mount <[hidden email]> wrote:
What did you figure out?   it would conclude the inquiry.  thanks

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:55 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a brown leaf with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these leaves--on the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas). Anyone recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies and the eggs/larvae?

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]> wrote:
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Debra Daugherty
OK, not to bore you all to tears about this, but after a brief respite, I am back to having a few brown-edged leaves. I was removing them from the plant and I noticed that they definitely have larvae inside (they even wiggled--blech!!). This time I got a photo! Can anyone identify? There are three clear larvae in the photo attached.

Guess I'd better spray again tonight .... Does anyone know whether there is anything I can apply at the root level that would take care of this? Back to the nematodes??

Thank you!
Debra

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 2:29 PM Claire Mount <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thank you!  and good luck

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 10:37 AM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
The insect is a candy-striped leafhopper (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphocephala_coccinea). The dots on the leaves are not eggs but puncture holes from sucking the sap. I don't see anything online saying that these bugs make the leaves turn brown (scorching). The wikipedia page indicates that they carry a bacterium Xylella fastidiosa that causes leaf scorch. Sounds worrying because the bacterium kills trees and is untreatable once a tree gets infected. However, I sprayed my plants repeatedly with Spinosad (Captain Jack's brand), and I have had only a very little browning of leaves since then, which is reassuring. Whatever is causing the browning in my perennial seems to be controlled by the spray.

I just went outside to look at my heliopsises and there were several leaf hoppers on them today, which means Spinosad is not super lethal. I was told it is "fast on, fast off". If you spray after dark, the bees and butterflies are not exposed until the next day at which time the Spinosad is already ineffective. More spraying as a consequence, but at least it's fairly benign. And so far seems effective enough.

Good luck with your plants!
Debra


--Debra

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:54 AM Claire Mount <[hidden email]> wrote:
What did you figure out?   it would conclude the inquiry.  thanks

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:55 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a brown leaf with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these leaves--on the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas). Anyone recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies and the eggs/larvae?

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]> wrote:
FYI
although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.

Disclaimers:
  • I've never dealt with Arbico
  • I've never used nematodes
  • No experience with Heliopsis
  • No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the pointer.
Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
mentions this:

Thrips: Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower petals, leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored flecking or silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from plant to plant. Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds from the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with your Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls.


Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of the plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae inside the leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have read that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would take care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy something like Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the stuff is absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too, thus saving my well-infested plant.

Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....

Thank you,
Debra
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LarvaeLeaf.jpg (1M) Download Attachment
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

John F. Carr
Assuming the leaf belongs to Heliopsis helianthoideas, the larvae
should belong to the fly species Agromyza rudbeckiana.  As the name
implies, the species also mines leaves of Rudbeckia.

On 6/28/20, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

> OK, not to bore you all to tears about this, but after a brief respite, I
> am back to having a few brown-edged leaves. I was removing them from the
> plant and I noticed that they definitely have larvae inside (they even
> wiggled--blech!!). This time I got a photo! Can anyone identify? There are
> three clear larvae in the photo attached.
>
> Guess I'd better spray again tonight .... Does anyone know whether there is
> anything I can apply at the root level that would take care of this? Back
> to the nematodes??
>
> Thank you!
> Debra
>
> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 2:29 PM Claire Mount <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Thank you!  and good luck
>>
>> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 10:37 AM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> The insect is a candy-striped leafhopper (
>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphocephala_coccinea). The dots on the
>>> leaves are not eggs but puncture holes from sucking the sap. I don't see
>>> anything online saying that these bugs make the leaves turn brown
>>> (scorching). The wikipedia page indicates that they carry a bacterium
>>> Xylella fastidiosa that causes leaf scorch. Sounds worrying because the
>>> bacterium kills trees and is untreatable once a tree gets infected.
>>> However, I sprayed my plants repeatedly with Spinosad (Captain Jack's
>>> brand), and I have had only a very little browning of leaves since then,
>>> which is reassuring. Whatever is causing the browning in my perennial
>>> seems
>>> to be controlled by the spray.
>>>
>>> I just went outside to look at my heliopsises and there were several
>>> leaf
>>> hoppers on them today, which means Spinosad is not super lethal. I was
>>> told
>>> it is "fast on, fast off". If you spray after dark, the bees and
>>> butterflies are not exposed until the next day at which time the
>>> Spinosad
>>> is already ineffective. More spraying as a consequence, but at least
>>> it's
>>> fairly benign. And so far seems effective enough.
>>>
>>> Good luck with your plants!
>>> Debra
>>>
>>>
>>> --Debra
>>>
>>> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:54 AM Claire Mount <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> What did you figure out?   it would conclude the inquiry.  thanks
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:55 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!
>>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty
>>>>> <[hidden email]>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty
>>>>>> <[hidden email]>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow
>>>>>>> dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a
>>>>>>> brown leaf
>>>>>>> with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these
>>>>>>> leaves--on
>>>>>>> the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas).
>>>>>>> Anyone
>>>>>>> recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies
>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> the eggs/larvae?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]>
>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> FYI
>>>>>>>> One source of nematodes is
>>>>>>>> https://www.arbico-organics.com/product/nemattack-beneficial-nematodes-sf-steinernema-feltiae
>>>>>>>> although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Disclaimers:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    - I've never dealt with Arbico
>>>>>>>>    - I've never used nematodes
>>>>>>>>    - No experience with Heliopsis
>>>>>>>>    - No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the
>>>>>>>> pointer.
>>>>>>>> Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> https://www.burpee.com/gardenadvicecenter/encyclopedia/perennials/learn-about-heliopsis/encyclopedia__Heliopsis-article.html
>>>>>>>> mentions this:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> *Thrips: *Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or
>>>>>>>>> straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower
>>>>>>>>> petals,
>>>>>>>>> leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored
>>>>>>>>> flecking or
>>>>>>>>> silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from
>>>>>>>>> plant
>>>>>>>>> to plant. *Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by
>>>>>>>>> sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds
>>>>>>>>> from
>>>>>>>>> the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with
>>>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>>>> Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls. *
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <
>>>>>>>> [hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come
>>>>>>>>> to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of
>>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>>> plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae
>>>>>>>>> inside the
>>>>>>>>> leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have
>>>>>>>>> read
>>>>>>>>> that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would
>>>>>>>>> take
>>>>>>>>> care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy
>>>>>>>>> something like
>>>>>>>>> Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the
>>>>>>>>> stuff is
>>>>>>>>> absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too,
>>>>>>>>> thus
>>>>>>>>> saving my well-infested plant.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Thank you,
>>>>>>>>> Debra
>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>
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Re: [LincolnTalk] garden question

Debra Daugherty
Nailed it! That looks like a perfect match. Thanks for the tip!

On Mon, Jun 29, 2020 at 7:00 AM John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:
Assuming the leaf belongs to Heliopsis helianthoideas, the larvae
should belong to the fly species Agromyza rudbeckiana.  As the name
implies, the species also mines leaves of Rudbeckia.

On 6/28/20, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:
> OK, not to bore you all to tears about this, but after a brief respite, I
> am back to having a few brown-edged leaves. I was removing them from the
> plant and I noticed that they definitely have larvae inside (they even
> wiggled--blech!!). This time I got a photo! Can anyone identify? There are
> three clear larvae in the photo attached.
>
> Guess I'd better spray again tonight .... Does anyone know whether there is
> anything I can apply at the root level that would take care of this? Back
> to the nematodes??
>
> Thank you!
> Debra
>
> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 2:29 PM Claire Mount <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Thank you!  and good luck
>>
>> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 10:37 AM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> The insect is a candy-striped leafhopper (
>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphocephala_coccinea). The dots on the
>>> leaves are not eggs but puncture holes from sucking the sap. I don't see
>>> anything online saying that these bugs make the leaves turn brown
>>> (scorching). The wikipedia page indicates that they carry a bacterium
>>> Xylella fastidiosa that causes leaf scorch. Sounds worrying because the
>>> bacterium kills trees and is untreatable once a tree gets infected.
>>> However, I sprayed my plants repeatedly with Spinosad (Captain Jack's
>>> brand), and I have had only a very little browning of leaves since then,
>>> which is reassuring. Whatever is causing the browning in my perennial
>>> seems
>>> to be controlled by the spray.
>>>
>>> I just went outside to look at my heliopsises and there were several
>>> leaf
>>> hoppers on them today, which means Spinosad is not super lethal. I was
>>> told
>>> it is "fast on, fast off". If you spray after dark, the bees and
>>> butterflies are not exposed until the next day at which time the
>>> Spinosad
>>> is already ineffective. More spraying as a consequence, but at least
>>> it's
>>> fairly benign. And so far seems effective enough.
>>>
>>> Good luck with your plants!
>>> Debra
>>>
>>>
>>> --Debra
>>>
>>> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:54 AM Claire Mount <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> What did you figure out?   it would conclude the inquiry.  thanks
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:55 PM Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Thanks to everyone that responded--got it all figured out now!
>>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:23 PM Debra Daugherty
>>>>> <[hidden email]>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hmm, I think it might be a leafhopper ....
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:17 PM Debra Daugherty
>>>>>> <[hidden email]>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks Rich. Here are photos of (1) the flying bug, (2) the yellow
>>>>>>> dots that I think are eggs in the leaf, and (3) a bad photo of a
>>>>>>> brown leaf
>>>>>>> with larvae in it (I threw away all the good examples of these
>>>>>>> leaves--on
>>>>>>> the others you could see worm-like things in the brown areas).
>>>>>>> Anyone
>>>>>>> recognize the bug or know what to do here both to eliminate the flies
>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> the eggs/larvae?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 2:06 PM Rich Rosenbaum <[hidden email]>
>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> FYI
>>>>>>>> One source of nematodes is
>>>>>>>> https://www.arbico-organics.com/product/nemattack-beneficial-nematodes-sf-steinernema-feltiae
>>>>>>>> although the minimum quantity is probably more than you would want.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Disclaimers:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>    - I've never dealt with Arbico
>>>>>>>>    - I've never used nematodes
>>>>>>>>    - No experience with Heliopsis
>>>>>>>>    - No idea what the best way is to deal with your pest
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> So please do more research, just thought I'd pass along the
>>>>>>>> pointer.
>>>>>>>> Burpee's page on Heliopsis,
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> https://www.burpee.com/gardenadvicecenter/encyclopedia/perennials/learn-about-heliopsis/encyclopedia__Heliopsis-article.html
>>>>>>>> mentions this:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> *Thrips: *Thrips are tiny needle-thin insects that are black or
>>>>>>>>> straw colored. They suck the juices of plants and attack flower
>>>>>>>>> petals,
>>>>>>>>> leaves and stems. The plant will have a stippling, discolored
>>>>>>>>> flecking or
>>>>>>>>> silvering of the leaf surface. Thrips can spread many diseases from
>>>>>>>>> plant
>>>>>>>>> to plant. *Burpee Recommends: Many thrips may be repelled by
>>>>>>>>> sheets of aluminum foil spread between rows of plants. Remove weeds
>>>>>>>>> from
>>>>>>>>> the bed and remove debris from the bed after frost. Check with
>>>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>>>> Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls. *
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Perhaps you could post a picture of the problem.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 12:43 PM Debra Daugherty <
>>>>>>>> [hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> My heliopsises are infested with something--the closest I can come
>>>>>>>>> to a match would be thrips. I have a spray to put on the leaves of
>>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>>> plants to get rid of the adults, but there are eggs and larvae
>>>>>>>>> inside the
>>>>>>>>> leaves and they are not killed by the topical applications. I have
>>>>>>>>> read
>>>>>>>>> that I could buy nematodes and put them in the soil and they would
>>>>>>>>> take
>>>>>>>>> care of it (not sure where to buy those ...). Or I could buy
>>>>>>>>> something like
>>>>>>>>> Bonide "granules" that go in the soil and get watered in and the
>>>>>>>>> stuff is
>>>>>>>>> absorbed by the plant and the eggs and larvae would be killed too,
>>>>>>>>> thus
>>>>>>>>> saving my well-infested plant.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Any advice? I'm a first-timer here ....
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Thank you,
>>>>>>>>> Debra
>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>

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