[LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

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[LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Bijoy Misra
Friends,
I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In corona times,
the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that the wreath has
been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections in the wreath. 
There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue egg in the top nest.
We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately fly out and shout from
a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is little reaction in the
rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in the top nest would
ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The fellow hardly responded
to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much help! 
The observation continues.
Regards,
Bijoy

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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

sharon antia
Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this adventure as time passes.  
-ska

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Friends,
I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In corona times,
the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that the wreath has
been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections in the wreath. 
There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue egg in the top nest.
We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately fly out and shout from
a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is little reaction in the
rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in the top nest would
ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The fellow hardly responded
to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much help! 
The observation continues.
Regards,
Bijoy

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--
-ska Sent from Gmail Mobile

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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Bijoy Misra
They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
The bird looks like an oriole.
I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
Possibly they would fly out before.
The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens. 
She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.


On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this adventure as time passes.  
-ska

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Friends,
I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In corona times,
the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that the wreath has
been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections in the wreath. 
There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue egg in the top nest.
We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately fly out and shout from
a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is little reaction in the
rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in the top nest would
ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The fellow hardly responded
to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much help! 
The observation continues.
Regards,
Bijoy

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--
-ska Sent from Gmail Mobile

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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Annamaria San Antonio-2
  Thanks Bijoy.  I appreciated your story and it made me think of one of my own.  

When I lived in the renovated barn behind the carriage House on the Codman estate, a mama robin took up residence in the twisted twine wreath hanging on the shed door across from my entrance.  It was a precariously narrow space on the wreath itself and it was not tacked on to the door very securely.  I feared a strong wind would blow it right off one day and make scrambled eggs out of her brood.  Each time I opened the door off she flew to a nearby perch and then squawked at me profusely until I was out of sight. 

So, when she was out presumably gathering worms, I set about securing it to the door more firmly.  See the photo of the renovations.  

One day when I stepped outside I noticed one of the small blue eggs had somehow rolled out of the nest and was on the ground just underneath. So, I gingerly placed it back marveling at how the delicate egg managed not to get broken and also at the fragility of life that grows up out of such precarious conditions. 

I was happy to be treated to a bird's eye view from the kitchen of the mother sitting on her eggs, the eventual hatching, and feeding, and launching of her peeps.. 
When they finally did fly the coop, as it were, I couldn’t help but feel that I had played a small hand in their coming of age.  :)  But, really those birds were the ones who contributed hugely to my story.

~Jai Kaur Annamaria San Antonio LCMT

Synergy ~ Massage+Yoga+Ayurveda

Achieving Wellness through Body/Mind/Spirit Synergy

144 Lincoln Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773

C: 781.738.1920  

[hidden email]



On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:42 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
The bird looks like an oriole.
I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
Possibly they would fly out before.
The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens. 
She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.


On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this adventure as time passes.  
-ska

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Friends,
I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In corona times,
the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that the wreath has
been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections in the wreath. 
There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue egg in the top nest.
We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately fly out and shout from
a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is little reaction in the
rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in the top nest would
ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The fellow hardly responded
to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much help! 
The observation continues.
Regards,
Bijoy

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-ska Sent from Gmail Mobile
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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

John F. Carr
Where I used to live there were magnolia trees in the yard.  In early
spring they would be covered in giant white flowers.  One spring a
pair of robins decided that mass of flowers would be a safe place to
build a nest.  Then all the flowers fell off and the leaves didn't
come out until a couple weeks later.  Their nest was exposed for
anybody to see.  Still, they managed to raise several chicks despite a
lot of foot traffic below.  I learned their sense of a safe ditstance
was 5 meters.  If I moved closer they would be alarmed.  Farther and
they wouldn't pay any attention.  I took a lot of pictures with my big
bird lens that couldn't focus closer than 7 meters.


On 7/5/20, Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:

>   Thanks Bijoy.  I appreciated your story and it made me think of one of my
> own.
>
> When I lived in the renovated barn behind the carriage House on the Codman
> estate, a mama robin took up residence in the twisted twine wreath hanging
> on the shed door across from my entrance.  It was a precariously narrow
> space on the wreath itself and it was not tacked on to the door very
> securely.  I feared a strong wind would blow it right off one day and make
> scrambled eggs out of her brood.  Each time I opened the door off she flew
> to a nearby perch and then squawked at me profusely until I was out of
> sight.
>
> So, when she was out presumably gathering worms, I set about securing it to
> the door more firmly.  See the photo of the renovations.
>
> One day when I stepped outside I noticed one of the small blue eggs had
> somehow rolled out of the nest and was on the ground just underneath. So, I
> gingerly placed it back marveling at how the delicate egg managed not to
> get broken and also at the fragility of life that grows up out of such
> precarious conditions.
>
> I was happy to be treated to a bird's eye view from the kitchen of the
> mother sitting on her eggs, the eventual hatching, and feeding, and
> launching of her peeps..
> When they finally did fly the coop, as it were, I couldn’t help but feel
> that I had played a small hand in their coming of age.  :)  But, really
> those birds were the ones who contributed hugely to my story.
>
> *~Jai Kaur Annamaria San Antonio LCMT*
>
> *Synergy* *~ Massage**+**Yoga**+**Ayurveda *
>
> *Achieving Wellness through Body/Mind/Spirit Synergy*
>
> *144 Lincoln Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773*
>
> *C: 781.738.1920   *
>
> *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:42 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
>> The bird looks like an oriole.
>> I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
>> Possibly they would fly out before.
>> The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
>> I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens.
>> She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
>> She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this
>>> adventure as time passes.
>>> -ska
>>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Friends,
>>>> I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In
>>>> corona times,
>>>> the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that
>>>> the
>>>> wreath has
>>>> been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections
>>>> in the wreath.
>>>> There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue
>>>> egg
>>>> in the top nest.
>>>> We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately
>>>> fly
>>>> out and shout from
>>>> a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is
>>>> little reaction in the
>>>> rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in
>>>> the top nest would
>>>> ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The
>>>> fellow
>>>> hardly responded
>>>> to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much
>>>> help!
>>>> The observation continues.
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Bijoy
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>> -ska Sent from Gmail Mobile
>>>
>> --
>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>> Browse the archives at
>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/
>> .
>> Change your subscription settings at
>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>
>>
>

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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Annamaria San Antonio-2
Interesting.
Good example of the valuable lessons animals teach us.  They were helping you learn to practice physical distancing!   😬

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2020, at 7:52 PM, John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Where I used to live there were magnolia trees in the yard.  In early
> spring they would be covered in giant white flowers.  One spring a
> pair of robins decided that mass of flowers would be a safe place to
> build a nest.  Then all the flowers fell off and the leaves didn't
> come out until a couple weeks later.  Their nest was exposed for
> anybody to see.  Still, they managed to raise several chicks despite a
> lot of foot traffic below.  I learned their sense of a safe ditstance
> was 5 meters.  If I moved closer they would be alarmed.  Farther and
> they wouldn't pay any attention.  I took a lot of pictures with my big
> bird lens that couldn't focus closer than 7 meters.
>
>
>> On 7/5/20, Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>  Thanks Bijoy.  I appreciated your story and it made me think of one of my
>> own.
>>
>> When I lived in the renovated barn behind the carriage House on the Codman
>> estate, a mama robin took up residence in the twisted twine wreath hanging
>> on the shed door across from my entrance.  It was a precariously narrow
>> space on the wreath itself and it was not tacked on to the door very
>> securely.  I feared a strong wind would blow it right off one day and make
>> scrambled eggs out of her brood.  Each time I opened the door off she flew
>> to a nearby perch and then squawked at me profusely until I was out of
>> sight.
>>
>> So, when she was out presumably gathering worms, I set about securing it to
>> the door more firmly.  See the photo of the renovations.
>>
>> One day when I stepped outside I noticed one of the small blue eggs had
>> somehow rolled out of the nest and was on the ground just underneath. So, I
>> gingerly placed it back marveling at how the delicate egg managed not to
>> get broken and also at the fragility of life that grows up out of such
>> precarious conditions.
>>
>> I was happy to be treated to a bird's eye view from the kitchen of the
>> mother sitting on her eggs, the eventual hatching, and feeding, and
>> launching of her peeps..
>> When they finally did fly the coop, as it were, I couldn’t help but feel
>> that I had played a small hand in their coming of age.  :)  But, really
>> those birds were the ones who contributed hugely to my story.
>>
>> *~Jai Kaur Annamaria San Antonio LCMT*
>>
>> *Synergy* *~ Massage**+**Yoga**+**Ayurveda *
>>
>> *Achieving Wellness through Body/Mind/Spirit Synergy*
>>
>> *144 Lincoln Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773*
>>
>> *C: 781.738.1920   *
>>
>> *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:42 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
>>> The bird looks like an oriole.
>>> I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
>>> Possibly they would fly out before.
>>> The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
>>> I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens.
>>> She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
>>> She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this
>>>> adventure as time passes.
>>>> -ska
>>>>
>>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Friends,
>>>>> I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In
>>>>> corona times,
>>>>> the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that
>>>>> the
>>>>> wreath has
>>>>> been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections
>>>>> in the wreath.
>>>>> There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue
>>>>> egg
>>>>> in the top nest.
>>>>> We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately
>>>>> fly
>>>>> out and shout from
>>>>> a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is
>>>>> little reaction in the
>>>>> rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in
>>>>> the top nest would
>>>>> ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The
>>>>> fellow
>>>>> hardly responded
>>>>> to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much
>>>>> help!
>>>>> The observation continues.
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Bijoy
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>> -ska Sent from Gmail Mobile
>>>>
>>> --
>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>> Browse the archives at
>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/
>>> .
>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>
>>>
>>
> <Robin feeding.jpg>
> --
> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
> Browse the archives at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
> Change your subscription settings at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>
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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Bijoy Misra
Now since the chicks are a little bigger, there is not enough room for the mother
in the nest.  She watches from a distance and shouts when I open the door.
One wonders how they protect the chicks against the predatory behavior in
the wild, unless the predator has compassion for the shouting mother!
There could be snakes, lizards, other heavier birds who might love to destroy the chicks.
The mother herself may fall prey because of her affection!
The bird might have some empirical recipe for a safe perch where traffic is infrequent.
The building of the nest appears as an engineering act, proportioned, just stable for the base!

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:10 PM Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
Interesting.
Good example of the valuable lessons animals teach us.  They were helping you learn to practice physical distancing!   😬

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2020, at 7:52 PM, John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Where I used to live there were magnolia trees in the yard.  In early
> spring they would be covered in giant white flowers.  One spring a
> pair of robins decided that mass of flowers would be a safe place to
> build a nest.  Then all the flowers fell off and the leaves didn't
> come out until a couple weeks later.  Their nest was exposed for
> anybody to see.  Still, they managed to raise several chicks despite a
> lot of foot traffic below.  I learned their sense of a safe ditstance
> was 5 meters.  If I moved closer they would be alarmed.  Farther and
> they wouldn't pay any attention.  I took a lot of pictures with my big
> bird lens that couldn't focus closer than 7 meters.
>
>
>> On 7/5/20, Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>  Thanks Bijoy.  I appreciated your story and it made me think of one of my
>> own.
>>
>> When I lived in the renovated barn behind the carriage House on the Codman
>> estate, a mama robin took up residence in the twisted twine wreath hanging
>> on the shed door across from my entrance.  It was a precariously narrow
>> space on the wreath itself and it was not tacked on to the door very
>> securely.  I feared a strong wind would blow it right off one day and make
>> scrambled eggs out of her brood.  Each time I opened the door off she flew
>> to a nearby perch and then squawked at me profusely until I was out of
>> sight.
>>
>> So, when she was out presumably gathering worms, I set about securing it to
>> the door more firmly.  See the photo of the renovations.
>>
>> One day when I stepped outside I noticed one of the small blue eggs had
>> somehow rolled out of the nest and was on the ground just underneath. So, I
>> gingerly placed it back marveling at how the delicate egg managed not to
>> get broken and also at the fragility of life that grows up out of such
>> precarious conditions.
>>
>> I was happy to be treated to a bird's eye view from the kitchen of the
>> mother sitting on her eggs, the eventual hatching, and feeding, and
>> launching of her peeps..
>> When they finally did fly the coop, as it were, I couldn’t help but feel
>> that I had played a small hand in their coming of age.  :)  But, really
>> those birds were the ones who contributed hugely to my story.
>>
>> *~Jai Kaur Annamaria San Antonio LCMT*
>>
>> *Synergy* *~ Massage**+**Yoga**+**Ayurveda *
>>
>> *Achieving Wellness through Body/Mind/Spirit Synergy*
>>
>> *144 Lincoln Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773*
>>
>> *C: 781.738.1920   *
>>
>> *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:42 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
>>> The bird looks like an oriole.
>>> I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
>>> Possibly they would fly out before.
>>> The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
>>> I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens.
>>> She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
>>> She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this
>>>> adventure as time passes.
>>>> -ska
>>>>
>>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Friends,
>>>>> I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In
>>>>> corona times,
>>>>> the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that
>>>>> the
>>>>> wreath has
>>>>> been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections
>>>>> in the wreath.
>>>>> There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue
>>>>> egg
>>>>> in the top nest.
>>>>> We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately
>>>>> fly
>>>>> out and shout from
>>>>> a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is
>>>>> little reaction in the
>>>>> rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in
>>>>> the top nest would
>>>>> ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The
>>>>> fellow
>>>>> hardly responded
>>>>> to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much
>>>>> help!
>>>>> The observation continues.
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Bijoy
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>> -ska Sent from Gmail Mobile
>>>>
>>> --
>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
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>>
> <Robin feeding.jpg>
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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Bijoy Misra
Orioles info from nwf.org
Eggs and young birds are especially vulnerable to predators such as squirrels, owls, large birds, and domestic cats. Adults put up a fight by sounding alarm calls and mobbing predators.
Details here

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:29 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Now since the chicks are a little bigger, there is not enough room for the mother
in the nest.  She watches from a distance and shouts when I open the door.
One wonders how they protect the chicks against the predatory behavior in
the wild, unless the predator has compassion for the shouting mother!
There could be snakes, lizards, other heavier birds who might love to destroy the chicks.
The mother herself may fall prey because of her affection!
The bird might have some empirical recipe for a safe perch where traffic is infrequent.
The building of the nest appears as an engineering act, proportioned, just stable for the base!

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:10 PM Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
Interesting.
Good example of the valuable lessons animals teach us.  They were helping you learn to practice physical distancing!   😬

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2020, at 7:52 PM, John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Where I used to live there were magnolia trees in the yard.  In early
> spring they would be covered in giant white flowers.  One spring a
> pair of robins decided that mass of flowers would be a safe place to
> build a nest.  Then all the flowers fell off and the leaves didn't
> come out until a couple weeks later.  Their nest was exposed for
> anybody to see.  Still, they managed to raise several chicks despite a
> lot of foot traffic below.  I learned their sense of a safe ditstance
> was 5 meters.  If I moved closer they would be alarmed.  Farther and
> they wouldn't pay any attention.  I took a lot of pictures with my big
> bird lens that couldn't focus closer than 7 meters.
>
>
>> On 7/5/20, Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>  Thanks Bijoy.  I appreciated your story and it made me think of one of my
>> own.
>>
>> When I lived in the renovated barn behind the carriage House on the Codman
>> estate, a mama robin took up residence in the twisted twine wreath hanging
>> on the shed door across from my entrance.  It was a precariously narrow
>> space on the wreath itself and it was not tacked on to the door very
>> securely.  I feared a strong wind would blow it right off one day and make
>> scrambled eggs out of her brood.  Each time I opened the door off she flew
>> to a nearby perch and then squawked at me profusely until I was out of
>> sight.
>>
>> So, when she was out presumably gathering worms, I set about securing it to
>> the door more firmly.  See the photo of the renovations.
>>
>> One day when I stepped outside I noticed one of the small blue eggs had
>> somehow rolled out of the nest and was on the ground just underneath. So, I
>> gingerly placed it back marveling at how the delicate egg managed not to
>> get broken and also at the fragility of life that grows up out of such
>> precarious conditions.
>>
>> I was happy to be treated to a bird's eye view from the kitchen of the
>> mother sitting on her eggs, the eventual hatching, and feeding, and
>> launching of her peeps..
>> When they finally did fly the coop, as it were, I couldn’t help but feel
>> that I had played a small hand in their coming of age.  :)  But, really
>> those birds were the ones who contributed hugely to my story.
>>
>> *~Jai Kaur Annamaria San Antonio LCMT*
>>
>> *Synergy* *~ Massage**+**Yoga**+**Ayurveda *
>>
>> *Achieving Wellness through Body/Mind/Spirit Synergy*
>>
>> *144 Lincoln Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773*
>>
>> *C: 781.738.1920   *
>>
>> *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:42 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
>>> The bird looks like an oriole.
>>> I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
>>> Possibly they would fly out before.
>>> The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
>>> I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens.
>>> She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
>>> She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this
>>>> adventure as time passes.
>>>> -ska
>>>>
>>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Friends,
>>>>> I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In
>>>>> corona times,
>>>>> the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that
>>>>> the
>>>>> wreath has
>>>>> been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections
>>>>> in the wreath.
>>>>> There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue
>>>>> egg
>>>>> in the top nest.
>>>>> We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately
>>>>> fly
>>>>> out and shout from
>>>>> a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is
>>>>> little reaction in the
>>>>> rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in
>>>>> the top nest would
>>>>> ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The
>>>>> fellow
>>>>> hardly responded
>>>>> to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much
>>>>> help!
>>>>> The observation continues.
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Bijoy
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>> -ska Sent from Gmail Mobile
>>>>
>>> --
>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
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>>> .
>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>
>>>
>>
> <Robin feeding.jpg>
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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Stanley J. Solomon
In reply to this post by Bijoy Misra


That’s truly amazing John. I had not before head of Robins native to a country on the metric system.

But by photographic contrast, in the Galápagos (Isabela Island) I saw a Galápagos Hawk sitting on a very large rock that was immediately at the side of the delineated path. I brought up my Nikon, focused and began slowly walking toward the bird to get a closer view. I eventually stopped when I realized that I was too close for the telephoto to properly focus. I backed up a bit and got a remakable photo.

The hawk absolutely never acknowledged that I was there. A guide explained that the birds had seen so few humans, all behaving quite properly, that humans were not recognized as potential threats. One hopes that WWF’s management of Galápagos tourism through these many years has preserved the animal's naiveté

Stanley J. Solomon
     [hidden email]


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Re: [LincolnTalk] July 5 musing

Diana Abrashkin
In reply to this post by Bijoy Misra
I'm wondering if the momma bird is a Robin. Robins do lay blue eggs & they do love Lincoln for child-rearing (just like home-buyers!), but Orioles lay dull-whitish eggs.
Keep up your great bird-sitting! 
Fondly, Diana

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:52 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Orioles info from nwf.org
Eggs and young birds are especially vulnerable to predators such as squirrels, owls, large birds, and domestic cats. Adults put up a fight by sounding alarm calls and mobbing predators.
Details here

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:29 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Now since the chicks are a little bigger, there is not enough room for the mother
in the nest.  She watches from a distance and shouts when I open the door.
One wonders how they protect the chicks against the predatory behavior in
the wild, unless the predator has compassion for the shouting mother!
There could be snakes, lizards, other heavier birds who might love to destroy the chicks.
The mother herself may fall prey because of her affection!
The bird might have some empirical recipe for a safe perch where traffic is infrequent.
The building of the nest appears as an engineering act, proportioned, just stable for the base!

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:10 PM Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
Interesting.
Good example of the valuable lessons animals teach us.  They were helping you learn to practice physical distancing!   😬

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2020, at 7:52 PM, John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Where I used to live there were magnolia trees in the yard.  In early
> spring they would be covered in giant white flowers.  One spring a
> pair of robins decided that mass of flowers would be a safe place to
> build a nest.  Then all the flowers fell off and the leaves didn't
> come out until a couple weeks later.  Their nest was exposed for
> anybody to see.  Still, they managed to raise several chicks despite a
> lot of foot traffic below.  I learned their sense of a safe ditstance
> was 5 meters.  If I moved closer they would be alarmed.  Farther and
> they wouldn't pay any attention.  I took a lot of pictures with my big
> bird lens that couldn't focus closer than 7 meters.
>
>
>> On 7/5/20, Annamaria San Antonio <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>  Thanks Bijoy.  I appreciated your story and it made me think of one of my
>> own.
>>
>> When I lived in the renovated barn behind the carriage House on the Codman
>> estate, a mama robin took up residence in the twisted twine wreath hanging
>> on the shed door across from my entrance.  It was a precariously narrow
>> space on the wreath itself and it was not tacked on to the door very
>> securely.  I feared a strong wind would blow it right off one day and make
>> scrambled eggs out of her brood.  Each time I opened the door off she flew
>> to a nearby perch and then squawked at me profusely until I was out of
>> sight.
>>
>> So, when she was out presumably gathering worms, I set about securing it to
>> the door more firmly.  See the photo of the renovations.
>>
>> One day when I stepped outside I noticed one of the small blue eggs had
>> somehow rolled out of the nest and was on the ground just underneath. So, I
>> gingerly placed it back marveling at how the delicate egg managed not to
>> get broken and also at the fragility of life that grows up out of such
>> precarious conditions.
>>
>> I was happy to be treated to a bird's eye view from the kitchen of the
>> mother sitting on her eggs, the eventual hatching, and feeding, and
>> launching of her peeps..
>> When they finally did fly the coop, as it were, I couldn’t help but feel
>> that I had played a small hand in their coming of age.  :)  But, really
>> those birds were the ones who contributed hugely to my story.
>>
>> *~Jai Kaur Annamaria San Antonio LCMT*
>>
>> *Synergy* *~ Massage**+**Yoga**+**Ayurveda *
>>
>> *Achieving Wellness through Body/Mind/Spirit Synergy*
>>
>> *144 Lincoln Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773*
>>
>> *C: 781.738.1920   *
>>
>> *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:42 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> They were blue-colored eggs, one is still remaining in the upper nest.
>>> The bird looks like an oriole.
>>> I am waiting to see when the infants will have the colors of the bird.
>>> Possibly they would fly out before.
>>> The mother shouts really hard when I try to peep.
>>> I think it is a defensive cry, but nobody listens.
>>> She perches herself at a fair distance and just shouts!
>>> She immediately comes to check on the children as I step out.
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:18 AM sharon antia <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Thank you For this lovely story Bijoy. I hope we hear more of this
>>>> adventure as time passes.
>>>> -ska
>>>>
>>>> On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 7:57 AM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Friends,
>>>>> I put an artificial spring wreath on the front door many years ago.  In
>>>>> corona times,
>>>>> the front door use is almost non-existent.  Lately I discovered that
>>>>> the
>>>>> wreath has
>>>>> been used as a nursery, with two nests on both the horizontal sections
>>>>> in the wreath.
>>>>> There are two infants incubating in the lower next.  There is a blue
>>>>> egg
>>>>> in the top nest.
>>>>> We use the side-door to go out and the mother bird would immediately
>>>>> fly
>>>>> out and shout from
>>>>> a distance.  She does not go very far but keeps shouting.  There is
>>>>> little reaction in the
>>>>> rest of the bird community to her shouts.  I don't know if the egg in
>>>>> the top nest would
>>>>> ever hatch. I saw the likely father in the nearby pine tree.  The
>>>>> fellow
>>>>> hardly responded
>>>>> to mother's urgent calls.  He possibly knew that he was of not much
>>>>> help!
>>>>> The observation continues.
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Bijoy
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>>>> Browse the archives at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
>>>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>> -ska Sent from Gmail Mobile
>>>>
>>> --
>>> The LincolnTalk mailing list.
>>> To post, send mail to [hidden email].
>>> Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
>>> Browse the archives at
>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/
>>> .
>>> Change your subscription settings at
>>> https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.
>>>
>>>
>>
> <Robin feeding.jpg>
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