[LincolnTalk] EEE & Mosquito Control

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[LincolnTalk] EEE & Mosquito Control

Orest Hurko
I asked for clarification from the Centers for Disease Control on their position on spraying to control mosquitoes, citing our discussions on Lincoln Talk after the EEE case in neighboring Sudbury.  This is their response:


CDCInfo <[hidden email]>

Tue, Sep 10, 3:50 PM (2 days ago)
to me

Thank you for contacting CDC-INFO.

Here is the information you requested about Eastern Equine Encephalitis and mosquito spraying. We hope you find the following information helpful.

Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is a rare disease and only a few cases are reported in the U.S. every year. It is caused by a virus spread to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. EEE cases are reported from the eastern half of the U.S. It can cause illness in people, horses, and some types of birds. Because 33 out of 100 people infected with EEE die and because most survivors have significant brain damage, EEE is considered one of the most serious diseases spread by mosquitoes in the U.S.

There are NO vaccines to prevent nor medications to treat EEE. You can reduce your risk of EEE by using insect repellant and wearing protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites.

The best way to prevent diseases spread by mosquitoes is to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites. Use EPA-registered insect repellent, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants, and remove standing water where mosquitoes could lay eggs.

Mosquito control districts or state and local government departments work to control mosquitoes. Unless a state health department has requested CDC technical assistance from CDC, decisions about vector mosquito surveillance and control are made and implemented locally. This includes decisions about types of mosquito control, (including whether or not to spray for mosquitoes). For information about mosquito control in your community, contact your local health department or mosquito abatement control district.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies insecticides for their effectiveness and safety. When applied according to label instructions, EPA-registered insecticides do not pose a risk to people.

  • During aerial spraying, a small amount of insecticide is sprayed over an area.
  • This small amount does not pose a health risk to people or pets in the area that is sprayed.
  • When aerial spraying is done correctly, it does not cause asthma attacks.
  • If people prefer to stay inside and close windows and doors when spraying takes place they can, but it is not necessary.

For more information on insecticides and health, consult the EPA, which oversees the registration of these chemicals. The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) can also provide information through a toll-free number, 1-800-858-7378.

If you are having health problems and think they are related to insecticides being used in your area, contact the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC). Call 1-800-858-7378 during business hours (Monday-Friday, 6:30 am-4:30 pm PT) OR e-mail NPIC at [hidden email]. You can also visit the National Pesticide Information Center at http://www.npic.orst.edu/ or ask your healthcare provider for advice.

Mosquito control districts or state and local government departments work to control mosquitoes. Unless a state health department has requested CDC technical assistance from CDC, decisions about vector mosquito surveillance and control are made and implemented locally. This includes decisions about types of mosquito control, (including whether or not to spray for mosquitoes). For information about mosquito control in your community, contact your local health department or mosquito abatement control district.

For more information, please visit the following CDC websites:

Eastern Equine Encephalitis 
http://www.cdc.gov/EasternEquineEncephalitis/index.html

Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
http://www.cdc.gov/EasternEquineEncephalitis/gen/qa.html

Mosquito control: What you need to know about aerial spraying
https://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/aerialspraying-factsheet.pdf

Mosquito control during an outbreak
https://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/mosquitocontrol_fs.pdf

Integrated Mosquito Management
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
https://www.cdc.gov/zika/vector/integrated_mosquito_management.html

Did you know: Important information about aerial spraying for mosquito control
https://mcphd-tx.org/wp-content/uploads/DYK-Aerial_Spraying.pdf

State & Territorial Health Department Websites
Center for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support
https://www.cdc.gov/publichealthgateway/healthdirectories/healthdepartments.html


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Re: [LincolnTalk] EEE & Mosquito Control

samattes
It seem that Lincoln/Park&Rec. have taken the bull by the horns for some areas in Lincoln.


On Sep 12, 2019, at 12:46 PM, Orest Hurko <[hidden email]> wrote:

I asked for clarification from the Centers for Disease Control on their position on spraying to control mosquitoes, citing our discussions on Lincoln Talk after the EEE case in neighboring Sudbury.  This is their response:


CDCInfo <[hidden email]>

Tue, Sep 10, 3:50 PM (2 days ago)
to me

Thank you for contacting CDC-INFO.

Here is the information you requested about Eastern Equine Encephalitis and mosquito spraying. We hope you find the following information helpful.

Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is a rare disease and only a few cases are reported in the U.S. every year. It is caused by a virus spread to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. EEE cases are reported from the eastern half of the U.S. It can cause illness in people, horses, and some types of birds. Because 33 out of 100 people infected with EEE die and because most survivors have significant brain damage, EEE is considered one of the most serious diseases spread by mosquitoes in the U.S.

There are NO vaccines to prevent nor medications to treat EEE. You can reduce your risk of EEE by using insect repellant and wearing protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites.

The best way to prevent diseases spread by mosquitoes is to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites. Use EPA-registered insect repellent, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants, and remove standing water where mosquitoes could lay eggs.

Mosquito control districts or state and local government departments work to control mosquitoes. Unless a state health department has requested CDC technical assistance from CDC, decisions about vector mosquito surveillance and control are made and implemented locally. This includes decisions about types of mosquito control, (including whether or not to spray for mosquitoes). For information about mosquito control in your community, contact your local health department or mosquito abatement control district.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies insecticides for their effectiveness and safety. When applied according to label instructions, EPA-registered insecticides do not pose a risk to people.

  • During aerial spraying, a small amount of insecticide is sprayed over an area.
  • This small amount does not pose a health risk to people or pets in the area that is sprayed.
  • When aerial spraying is done correctly, it does not cause asthma attacks.
  • If people prefer to stay inside and close windows and doors when spraying takes place they can, but it is not necessary.

For more information on insecticides and health, consult the EPA, which oversees the registration of these chemicals. The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) can also provide information through a toll-free number, 1-800-858-7378.

If you are having health problems and think they are related to insecticides being used in your area, contact the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC). Call 1-800-858-7378 during business hours (Monday-Friday, 6:30 am-4:30 pm PT) OR e-mail NPIC at [hidden email]. You can also visit the National Pesticide Information Center at http://www.npic.orst.edu/ or ask your healthcare provider for advice.

Mosquito control districts or state and local government departments work to control mosquitoes. Unless a state health department has requested CDC technical assistance from CDC, decisions about vector mosquito surveillance and control are made and implemented locally. This includes decisions about types of mosquito control, (including whether or not to spray for mosquitoes). For information about mosquito control in your community, contact your local health department or mosquito abatement control district.

For more information, please visit the following CDC websites:

Eastern Equine Encephalitis 
http://www.cdc.gov/EasternEquineEncephalitis/index.html

Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
http://www.cdc.gov/EasternEquineEncephalitis/gen/qa.html

Mosquito control: What you need to know about aerial spraying
https://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/aerialspraying-factsheet.pdf

Mosquito control during an outbreak
https://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/mosquitocontrol_fs.pdf

Integrated Mosquito Management
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
https://www.cdc.gov/zika/vector/integrated_mosquito_management.html

Did you know: Important information about aerial spraying for mosquito control
https://mcphd-tx.org/wp-content/uploads/DYK-Aerial_Spraying.pdf


State & Territorial Health Department Websites
Center for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support
https://www.cdc.gov/publichealthgateway/healthdirectories/healthdepartments.html

--
The LincolnTalk mailing list.
To post, send mail to [hidden email].
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Browse the archives at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
Change your subscription settings at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.



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Search the archives at http://lincoln.2330058.n4.nabble.com/.
Browse the archives at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
Change your subscription settings at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.