[LincolnTalk] CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

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[LincolnTalk] CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Dennis Liu

Staci -- absolutely; all of us in Lincoln should follow the common-sense recommendations that *INDIVIDUALS* can take to prevent EEE infection.  The site to which you linked is intended for individuals, and what each of us can do ourselves at home.  It is not the whole story of what the CDC recommends with respect to overall mosquito, control.  From a *public health* position, however, Integrated Pest Management ("IPM") is recommended by the CDC.  Which does include the application of pesticides. 

 

>"Both CDC and EPA recognize a legitimate and compelling need for the use of chemical interventions, under certain circumstances, to control adult mosquitoes. This is especially true during periods of mosquito-borne disease transmission or when source reduction and larval control have failed or are not feasible. "

 

I am somewhat gobsmacked that people continue to believe that we lack the ability to control mosquitoes.  We have proven that an integrated approach, including spraying, will control or even eliminate diseases borne by mosquitoes. 

 

>Epidemic transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Sacramento County, California, in 2005 prompted aerial application of pyrethrin, a mosquito adulticide, over a large urban area. Statistical analyses of geographic information system datasets indicated that adulticiding reduced the number of human WNV cases within 2 treated areas compared with the untreated area of the county. When we adjusted for maximum incubation period of the virus from infection to onset of symptoms, no new cases were reported in either of the treated areas after adulticiding; 18 new cases were reported in the untreated area of Sacramento County during this time. Results indicated that the odds of infection after spraying were ≈6× higher in the untreated area than in treated areas, and that the treatments successfully disrupted the WNV transmission cycle. Our results provide direct evidence that aerial mosquito adulticiding is effective in reducing human illness and potential death from WNV infection.  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/14/5/07-1347_article

 

From the CDC again:

 

>Using an EPA-registered pesticide is one of the fastest and best options to combat an outbreak of mosquito-borne disease being transmitted by adult mosquitoes. The pesticides registered for this use are known as adulticides.  Adulticides are applied either using aerial applications by aircraft or on the ground by truck-mounted sprayers.

 

Aerial spraying techniques can treat large areas with only small amounts of pesticide and have been used safely for more than 50 years. These aerial sprays are been fully evaluated by EPA and don’t pose risks to people or the environment when used according to the directions on the label.

 

Mosquito adulticides are applied as ultra-low volume (ULV) sprays. ULV sprayers dispense extremely small droplets. The naled insecticide, for example, uses 80 microns or less which means hundreds of thousands of droplets could fit inside something as small as one pea. When released from an airplane, these tiny droplets are intended to stay airborne as long as possible and drift through an area above the ground killing the mosquitoes in the air on contact. The small droplet size makes the pesticide more effective, which means less pesticide is used to better protect people and the environment.

 

Extensive scientific research has been conducted by academia, industry, and government agencies to identify appropriate droplet sizes for individual compounds. The equipment nozzles undergo rigorous testing before being sold to the mosquito controllers. ULV applications involve very small quantities of pesticide active ingredient in relation to the size of the area treated.

 

There are a number of registered adulticides to choose from. Choosing which adulticide to use in a given area is a job best done by experts and will depend on a variety of factors such as the type of mosquito, whether the mosquitoes are resistant to particular types of pesticides, weather, etc. In Puerto Rico, naled was the only existing product to show 100% mosquito death in all populations tested. 

 

The mainland U.S. has successfully used naled to quickly reduce mosquito populations.. This pesticide has been used for routine mosquito control and following natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods on millions of acres across the U.S. Naled was used recently for mosquito control in FL, TX, LA, GA, SC, GA, WA, CA, NV, and in a number of other states. The insecticide is used highly populated metropolitan areas, such as Miami, and in less populated areas.

 

https://www.epa.gov/mosquitocontrol/success-mosquito-control-integrated-approach

 

See also:  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/7/1/70-0017_article  “Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management.”

 

And the CDC generally on spraying:  https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/vectorcontrol/aerial-spraying.html

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Staci Montori
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2019 11:14 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

Hi Seth,

 

I have consulted the CDC Website and I and my children are now taking their advice to be on the safe side, though I still think our chances of contracting EEE is extremely unlikely. No doubt though, The EEE case in Sudbury is a heart breaking sad tragedy.

 

My experience so far is with the CDC's advice I have not/ will not be bitten by a mosquito (it seems to work amazingly well and we have a lot of

mosquitoes.) I can't help but wonder if the people suffering from EEE took these recommended precautions.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/easternequineencephalitis/gen/pre.html

 

Taking these precautions, I see no need to have our town sprayed with chemicals that will harm way more than just mosquitoes.  Our ecosystems are already suffering greatly with climate change- fireflies, dragonflies and other insect populations, bats, amphibians are dwindling seriously low. I sure don't want to push them closer to this.

 

I do not see that the CDC is recommending aerial spraying, did you see this somewhere that I have missed.

 

Thanks.

 

Staci Montori

 

 

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Staci Montori
Thanks Dennis but my question was for Seth and with regards to CDC and aerial spraying for EEE.  
I work in health care and follow infectious disease very closely and I don’t see it on the CDCs sight and I was thinking he may have. 



On Sep 9, 2019, at 11:41 AM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

Staci -- absolutely; all of us in Lincoln should follow the common-sense recommendations that *INDIVIDUALS* can take to prevent EEE infection.  The site to which you linked is intended for individuals, and what each of us can do ourselves at home.  It is not the whole story of what the CDC recommends with respect to overall mosquito, control.  From a *public health* position, however, Integrated Pest Management ("IPM") is recommended by the CDC.  Which does include the application of pesticides. 
 
>"Both CDC and EPA recognize a legitimate and compelling need for the use of chemical interventions, under certain circumstances, to control adult mosquitoes. This is especially true during periods of mosquito-borne disease transmission or when source reduction and larval control have failed or are not feasible. "
 
I am somewhat gobsmacked that people continue to believe that we lack the ability to control mosquitoes.  We have proven that an integrated approach, including spraying, will control or even eliminate diseases borne by mosquitoes. 
 
>Epidemic transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Sacramento County, California, in 2005 prompted aerial application of pyrethrin, a mosquito adulticide, over a large urban area. Statistical analyses of geographic information system datasets indicated that adulticiding reduced the number of human WNV cases within 2 treated areas compared with the untreated area of the county. When we adjusted for maximum incubation period of the virus from infection to onset of symptoms, no new cases were reported in either of the treated areas after adulticiding; 18 new cases were reported in the untreated area of Sacramento County during this time. Results indicated that the odds of infection after spraying were ≈6× higher in the untreated area than in treated areas, and that the treatments successfully disrupted the WNV transmission cycle. Our results provide direct evidence that aerial mosquito adulticiding is effective in reducing human illness and potential death from WNV infection. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/14/5/07-1347_article
 
From the CDC again:
 
>Using an EPA-registered pesticide is one of the fastest and best options to combat an outbreak of mosquito-borne disease being transmitted by adult mosquitoes. The pesticides registered for this use are known as adulticides.  Adulticides are applied either using aerial applications by aircraft or on the ground by truck-mounted sprayers.
 
Aerial spraying techniques can treat large areas with only small amounts of pesticide and have been used safely for more than 50 years. These aerial sprays are been fully evaluated by EPA and don’t pose risks to people or the environment when used according to the directions on the label.
 
Mosquito adulticides are applied as ultra-low volume (ULV) sprays. ULV sprayers dispense extremely small droplets. The naled insecticide, for example, uses 80 microns or less which means hundreds of thousands of droplets could fit inside something as small as one pea. When released from an airplane, these tiny droplets are intended to stay airborne as long as possible and drift through an area above the ground killing the mosquitoes in the air on contact. The small droplet size makes the pesticide more effective, which means less pesticide is used to better protect people and the environment.
 
Extensive scientific research has been conducted by academia, industry, and government agencies to identify appropriate droplet sizes for individual compounds. The equipment nozzles undergo rigorous testing before being sold to the mosquito controllers. ULV applications involve very small quantities of pesticide active ingredient in relation to the size of the area treated.
 
There are a number of registered adulticides to choose from. Choosing which adulticide to use in a given area is a job best done by experts and will depend on a variety of factors such as the type of mosquito, whether the mosquitoes are resistant to particular types of pesticides, weather, etc. In Puerto Rico, naled was the only existing product to show 100% mosquito death in all populations tested. 
 
The mainland U.S. has successfully used naled to quickly reduce mosquito populations.. This pesticide has been used for routine mosquito control and following natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods on millions of acres across the U.S. Naled was used recently for mosquito control in FL, TX, LA, GA, SC, GA, WA, CA, NV, and in a number of other states. The insecticide is used highly populated metropolitan areas, such as Miami, and in less populated areas.
 
 
See also:  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/7/1/70-0017_article  “Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management.”
 
 
Vty,
 
--Dennis
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Staci Montori
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2019 11:14 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth
 
Hi Seth,
 
I have consulted the CDC Website and I and my children are now taking their advice to be on the safe side, though I still think our chances of contracting EEE is extremely unlikely. No doubt though, The EEE case in Sudbury is a heart breaking sad tragedy.
 
My experience so far is with the CDC's advice I have not/ will not be bitten by a mosquito (it seems to work amazingly well and we have a lot of
mosquitoes.) I can't help but wonder if the people suffering from EEE took these recommended precautions.
 
 
Taking these precautions, I see no need to have our town sprayed with chemicals that will harm way more than just mosquitoes.  Our ecosystems are already suffering greatly with climate change- fireflies, dragonflies and other insect populations, bats, amphibians are dwindling seriously low. I sure don't want to push them closer to this.
 
I do not see that the CDC is recommending aerial spraying, did you see this somewhere that I have missed.
 
Thanks.
 
Staci Montori
 
 
 
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Re: [LincolnTalk] CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Dennis Liu

Staci, I must admit to some confusion; did you read my email?  It cites the CDC position on spraying for mosquito control.  Several links are provided.

 

I guess if you’re looking for a specific recommendation from the CDC for spraying to control *EEE*, then, I guess you’re right, in that I too have not seen anything from the CDC on that *specific* question.  However, I take the following logical conclusion:

 

  1. The CDC concludes that spraying as an important part of integrated pest management, stating that it’s safe and effective for the control of mosquito populations.
  2. The US has had great success in using spraying, as part of IPM, in reducing or eliminating a variety of mosquito-borne diseases in many areas around the country.
  3. Mosquitoes are the vector for EEE.
  4. THEREFORE, public health officials should include all the elements of IPM, including targeted spraying, when an outbreak of a deadly mosquito borne disease like EEE happens in their area.

 

Am I missing something?

 

--Dennis

 

 

From: Staci Montori <[hidden email]>
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2019 11:55 AM
To: Dennis Liu <[hidden email]>; <[hidden email]> <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

Thanks Dennis but my question was for Seth and with regards to CDC and aerial spraying for EEE.  

I work in health care and follow infectious disease very closely and I don’t see it on the CDCs sight and I was thinking he may have. 

 

 

 

On Sep 9, 2019, at 11:41 AM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:



Staci -- absolutely; all of us in Lincoln should follow the common-sense recommendations that *INDIVIDUALS* can take to prevent EEE infection.  The site to which you linked is intended for individuals, and what each of us can do ourselves at home.  It is not the whole story of what the CDC recommends with respect to overall mosquito, control.  From a *public health* position, however, Integrated Pest Management ("IPM") is recommended by the CDC.  Which does include the application of pesticides. 

 

>"Both CDC and EPA recognize a legitimate and compelling need for the use of chemical interventions, under certain circumstances, to control adult mosquitoes. This is especially true during periods of mosquito-borne disease transmission or when source reduction and larval control have failed or are not feasible. "

 

I am somewhat gobsmacked that people continue to believe that we lack the ability to control mosquitoes.  We have proven that an integrated approach, including spraying, will control or even eliminate diseases borne by mosquitoes. 

 

>Epidemic transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Sacramento County, California, in 2005 prompted aerial application of pyrethrin, a mosquito adulticide, over a large urban area. Statistical analyses of geographic information system datasets indicated that adulticiding reduced the number of human WNV cases within 2 treated areas compared with the untreated area of the county. When we adjusted for maximum incubation period of the virus from infection to onset of symptoms, no new cases were reported in either of the treated areas after adulticiding; 18 new cases were reported in the untreated area of Sacramento County during this time. Results indicated that the odds of infection after spraying were ≈6× higher in the untreated area than in treated areas, and that the treatments successfully disrupted the WNV transmission cycle. Our results provide direct evidence that aerial mosquito adulticiding is effective in reducing human illness and potential death from WNV infection. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/14/5/07-1347_article

 

From the CDC again:

 

>Using an EPA-registered pesticide is one of the fastest and best options to combat an outbreak of mosquito-borne disease being transmitted by adult mosquitoes. The pesticides registered for this use are known as adulticides.  Adulticides are applied either using aerial applications by aircraft or on the ground by truck-mounted sprayers.

 

Aerial spraying techniques can treat large areas with only small amounts of pesticide and have been used safely for more than 50 years. These aerial sprays are been fully evaluated by EPA and don’t pose risks to people or the environment when used according to the directions on the label.

 

Mosquito adulticides are applied as ultra-low volume (ULV) sprays. ULV sprayers dispense extremely small droplets. The naled insecticide, for example, uses 80 microns or less which means hundreds of thousands of droplets could fit inside something as small as one pea. When released from an airplane, these tiny droplets are intended to stay airborne as long as possible and drift through an area above the ground killing the mosquitoes in the air on contact. The small droplet size makes the pesticide more effective, which means less pesticide is used to better protect people and the environment.

 

Extensive scientific research has been conducted by academia, industry, and government agencies to identify appropriate droplet sizes for individual compounds. The equipment nozzles undergo rigorous testing before being sold to the mosquito controllers. ULV applications involve very small quantities of pesticide active ingredient in relation to the size of the area treated.

 

There are a number of registered adulticides to choose from. Choosing which adulticide to use in a given area is a job best done by experts and will depend on a variety of factors such as the type of mosquito, whether the mosquitoes are resistant to particular types of pesticides, weather, etc. In Puerto Rico, naled was the only existing product to show 100% mosquito death in all populations tested. 

 

The mainland U.S. has successfully used naled to quickly reduce mosquito populations.. This pesticide has been used for routine mosquito control and following natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods on millions of acres across the U.S. Naled was used recently for mosquito control in FL, TX, LA, GA, SC, GA, WA, CA, NV, and in a number of other states. The insecticide is used highly populated metropolitan areas, such as Miami, and in less populated areas.

 

 

See also:  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/7/1/70-0017_article  “Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management.”

 

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Staci Montori
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2019 11:14 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

Hi Seth,

 

I have consulted the CDC Website and I and my children are now taking their advice to be on the safe side, though I still think our chances of contracting EEE is extremely unlikely. No doubt though, The EEE case in Sudbury is a heart breaking sad tragedy.

 

My experience so far is with the CDC's advice I have not/ will not be bitten by a mosquito (it seems to work amazingly well and we have a lot of

mosquitoes.) I can't help but wonder if the people suffering from EEE took these recommended precautions.

 

 

Taking these precautions, I see no need to have our town sprayed with chemicals that will harm way more than just mosquitoes.  Our ecosystems are already suffering greatly with climate change- fireflies, dragonflies and other insect populations, bats, amphibians are dwindling seriously low. I sure don't want to push them closer to this.

 

I do not see that the CDC is recommending aerial spraying, did you see this somewhere that I have missed.

 

Thanks.

 

Staci Montori

 

 

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Seth Rosen
I would hypothesize that the reason the CDC doesn't make "recommendations" is because mosquito control is by definition a very local problem.  Therefore integrated pest management should be done at the local level.

They just provide useful information on efficacy and safety.  I don't believe I ever characterized the CDC as having tendered a recommendation, I simply cited them as one (admittedly non-primary, but still likely reliable) resource.

Seth I Rosen
Cell: 617-771-5602
Email: [hidden email]


On Mon, Sep 9, 2019 at 12:02 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

Staci, I must admit to some confusion; did you read my email?  It cites the CDC position on spraying for mosquito control.  Several links are provided.

 

I guess if you’re looking for a specific recommendation from the CDC for spraying to control *EEE*, then, I guess you’re right, in that I too have not seen anything from the CDC on that *specific* question.  However, I take the following logical conclusion:

 

  1. The CDC concludes that spraying as an important part of integrated pest management, stating that it’s safe and effective for the control of mosquito populations.
  2. The US has had great success in using spraying, as part of IPM, in reducing or eliminating a variety of mosquito-borne diseases in many areas around the country.
  3. Mosquitoes are the vector for EEE.
  4. THEREFORE, public health officials should include all the elements of IPM, including targeted spraying, when an outbreak of a deadly mosquito borne disease like EEE happens in their area.

 

Am I missing something?

 

--Dennis

 

 

From: Staci Montori <[hidden email]>
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2019 11:55 AM
To: Dennis Liu <[hidden email]>; <[hidden email]> <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: CDC does recommend the application of pesticides | RE: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

Thanks Dennis but my question was for Seth and with regards to CDC and aerial spraying for EEE.  

I work in health care and follow infectious disease very closely and I don’t see it on the CDCs sight and I was thinking he may have. 

 

 

 

On Sep 9, 2019, at 11:41 AM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:



Staci -- absolutely; all of us in Lincoln should follow the common-sense recommendations that *INDIVIDUALS* can take to prevent EEE infection.  The site to which you linked is intended for individuals, and what each of us can do ourselves at home.  It is not the whole story of what the CDC recommends with respect to overall mosquito, control.  From a *public health* position, however, Integrated Pest Management ("IPM") is recommended by the CDC.  Which does include the application of pesticides. 

 

>"Both CDC and EPA recognize a legitimate and compelling need for the use of chemical interventions, under certain circumstances, to control adult mosquitoes. This is especially true during periods of mosquito-borne disease transmission or when source reduction and larval control have failed or are not feasible. "

 

I am somewhat gobsmacked that people continue to believe that we lack the ability to control mosquitoes.  We have proven that an integrated approach, including spraying, will control or even eliminate diseases borne by mosquitoes. 

 

>Epidemic transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Sacramento County, California, in 2005 prompted aerial application of pyrethrin, a mosquito adulticide, over a large urban area. Statistical analyses of geographic information system datasets indicated that adulticiding reduced the number of human WNV cases within 2 treated areas compared with the untreated area of the county. When we adjusted for maximum incubation period of the virus from infection to onset of symptoms, no new cases were reported in either of the treated areas after adulticiding; 18 new cases were reported in the untreated area of Sacramento County during this time. Results indicated that the odds of infection after spraying were ≈6× higher in the untreated area than in treated areas, and that the treatments successfully disrupted the WNV transmission cycle. Our results provide direct evidence that aerial mosquito adulticiding is effective in reducing human illness and potential death from WNV infection. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/14/5/07-1347_article

 

From the CDC again:

 

>Using an EPA-registered pesticide is one of the fastest and best options to combat an outbreak of mosquito-borne disease being transmitted by adult mosquitoes. The pesticides registered for this use are known as adulticides.  Adulticides are applied either using aerial applications by aircraft or on the ground by truck-mounted sprayers.

 

Aerial spraying techniques can treat large areas with only small amounts of pesticide and have been used safely for more than 50 years. These aerial sprays are been fully evaluated by EPA and don’t pose risks to people or the environment when used according to the directions on the label.

 

Mosquito adulticides are applied as ultra-low volume (ULV) sprays. ULV sprayers dispense extremely small droplets. The naled insecticide, for example, uses 80 microns or less which means hundreds of thousands of droplets could fit inside something as small as one pea. When released from an airplane, these tiny droplets are intended to stay airborne as long as possible and drift through an area above the ground killing the mosquitoes in the air on contact. The small droplet size makes the pesticide more effective, which means less pesticide is used to better protect people and the environment.

 

Extensive scientific research has been conducted by academia, industry, and government agencies to identify appropriate droplet sizes for individual compounds. The equipment nozzles undergo rigorous testing before being sold to the mosquito controllers. ULV applications involve very small quantities of pesticide active ingredient in relation to the size of the area treated.

 

There are a number of registered adulticides to choose from. Choosing which adulticide to use in a given area is a job best done by experts and will depend on a variety of factors such as the type of mosquito, whether the mosquitoes are resistant to particular types of pesticides, weather, etc. In Puerto Rico, naled was the only existing product to show 100% mosquito death in all populations tested. 

 

The mainland U.S. has successfully used naled to quickly reduce mosquito populations.. This pesticide has been used for routine mosquito control and following natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods on millions of acres across the U.S. Naled was used recently for mosquito control in FL, TX, LA, GA, SC, GA, WA, CA, NV, and in a number of other states. The insecticide is used highly populated metropolitan areas, such as Miami, and in less populated areas.

 

 

See also:  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/7/1/70-0017_article  “Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management.”

 

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Staci Montori
Sent: Monday, September 9, 2019 11:14 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

Hi Seth,

 

I have consulted the CDC Website and I and my children are now taking their advice to be on the safe side, though I still think our chances of contracting EEE is extremely unlikely. No doubt though, The EEE case in Sudbury is a heart breaking sad tragedy.

 

My experience so far is with the CDC's advice I have not/ will not be bitten by a mosquito (it seems to work amazingly well and we have a lot of

mosquitoes.) I can't help but wonder if the people suffering from EEE took these recommended precautions.

 

 

Taking these precautions, I see no need to have our town sprayed with chemicals that will harm way more than just mosquitoes.  Our ecosystems are already suffering greatly with climate change- fireflies, dragonflies and other insect populations, bats, amphibians are dwindling seriously low. I sure don't want to push them closer to this.

 

I do not see that the CDC is recommending aerial spraying, did you see this somewhere that I have missed.

 

Thanks.

 

Staci Montori

 

 

 

--

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Change your subscription settings at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.

 

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