[LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

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[LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

samattes
The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.





Sara












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End of an Era-Changing of the times: West Concord 5&10 closing; Deb's planning expansion - News - The Concord Journal - Concord, MA.pdf (77K) Download Attachment
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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Lincoln mailing list

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 
On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:


The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.



Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Dennis Liu
In reply to this post by samattes
Sara Mattes wrote:

1. >While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.  That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.  West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.  All that has changed.  Is it for the better?  It depends on your goals.  If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.  If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
----------

A quick Google search reveals that the new, "upscale" Prescott apartments available now in West Concord start at $2,202 for a 1 bedroom, and $2,361 for a 2 bedroom.  At the Wedgewood Common apartment building, which has been there since before the gentrification wave that Sara is bemoaning, an available 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  And Hawthorne Village, which appears to be of the same vintage as Wedgewood, a 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  https://www.apartments.com/the-prescott-at-concord-concord-ma/r66e0b3/  https://www.apartments.com/wedgewood-common-apartments-concord-ma/gk0z60z/   https://www.apartments.com/hawthorne-village-concord-ma/dccec4k/

The median market rent for apartments in Concord is . . . $3,475.  https://www.concordma.gov/629/Affordable-Housing-Information

Sara, you had been a very vocal proponent of the Oriole Landing development project, with the thrust of your messaging that Lincoln should approve that project so that we can avoid future high density housing (under 40B).  In essence, better to let THIS upscale, high density housing project into Lincoln, so that we don't have FUTURE high density housing.  And that because Lincoln would be at 14% affordable housing (as defined) with Oriole Landing, that is more than enough affordable housing in town.

So...  which is it?  Should West Concord have built MORE of these new apartment buildings -- which are offered at rates BELOW the median market rent for Concord?  Or fewer?  Or should Concord choose a path, like what you advocated Lincoln should do -- permit JUST ENOUGH affordable housing to keep above the 10% threshold to avoid 40B?  Instead of permitting more apartment complexes at higher densities, thereby enabling those you feel should be entitled to live in Concord - school teachers and fire fighters?

The solution is pretty simple, right?  Want more affordable housing?  Let developers build them.  One cannot logically want both affordable housing but also a limited stock and restrictions on density.

Vty,

--Dennis


-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 2:21 PM
To: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.


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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

samattes
FYI
This is the new development in West Concord.
https://www.brooksidesquareconcord.com/floor-plans.aspx?beds=1&baths=1&moveindate=07/31/2020#k=47479

The links you provided are the older developments, and not directly in the village center…most have been there for quite some time and have been a part of the mix… a far cry from Brookside.



> On Jul 24, 2020, at 3:00 PM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Sara Mattes wrote:
>
> 1. >While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.  That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.  West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.  All that has changed.  Is it for the better?  It depends on your goals.  If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.  If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
> ----------
>
> A quick Google search reveals that the new, "upscale" Prescott apartments available now in West Concord start at $2,202 for a 1 bedroom, and $2,361 for a 2 bedroom.  At the Wedgewood Common apartment building, which has been there since before the gentrification wave that Sara is bemoaning, an available 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  And Hawthorne Village, which appears to be of the same vintage as Wedgewood, a 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  https://www.apartments.com/the-prescott-at-concord-concord-ma/r66e0b3/  https://www.apartments.com/wedgewood-common-apartments-concord-ma/gk0z60z/   https://www.apartments.com/hawthorne-village-concord-ma/dccec4k/
>
> The median market rent for apartments in Concord is . . . $3,475.  https://www.concordma.gov/629/Affordable-Housing-Information
>
> Sara, you had been a very vocal proponent of the Oriole Landing development project, with the thrust of your messaging that Lincoln should approve that project so that we can avoid future high density housing (under 40B).  In essence, better to let THIS upscale, high density housing project into Lincoln, so that we don't have FUTURE high density housing.  And that because Lincoln would be at 14% affordable housing (as defined) with Oriole Landing, that is more than enough affordable housing in town.
>
> So...  which is it?  Should West Concord have built MORE of these new apartment buildings -- which are offered at rates BELOW the median market rent for Concord?  Or fewer?  Or should Concord choose a path, like what you advocated Lincoln should do -- permit JUST ENOUGH affordable housing to keep above the 10% threshold to avoid 40B?  Instead of permitting more apartment complexes at higher densities, thereby enabling those you feel should be entitled to live in Concord - school teachers and fire fighters?
>
> The solution is pretty simple, right?  Want more affordable housing?  Let developers build them.  One cannot logically want both affordable housing but also a limited stock and restrictions on density.
>
> Vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 2:21 PM
> To: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
> Subject: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.
>
> The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.
>
> The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
> How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
> How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
> How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
> How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
> And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
> Quintessential small town.
>
> Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
> I am so sad to think future generations will not.
>
>
> While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.
>
> That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
> West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
> All that has changed.
> Is it for the better?
> It depends on your goals.
> If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
> If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
> .
>
> We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.
>
>

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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Dennis Liu
Sara wrote:  >The links you provided are the older developments, and not directly in the village center…most have been there for quite some time and have been a part of the mix… a far cry from Brookside.

I provided three links, all intentional.  One, the Prescott development, was, to me, an upscale new apartment complex with nice amenities in West Newton with available apartments.  The other two were indeed, there for quite some time -- but I listed them to provide *contrast* to the Prescott.  The rents were equivalent among all three, at ~$2,300.

As to the Brookside one that you cite, it is the more luxurious yet.  A little more Google shows that a two bedroom apartment there is . . . $3,050.  

***WHICH IS STILL BELOW the median market rent for apartments in Concord of $3,475 (per the Concord housing commission).***

My point remains.

--Dennis


-----Original Message-----
From: Sara Mattes <[hidden email]>
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 3:48 PM
To: Dennis Liu <[hidden email]>
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

FYI
This is the new development in West Concord.
https://www.brooksidesquareconcord.com/floor-plans.aspx?beds=1&baths=1&moveindate=07/31/2020#k=47479

The links you provided are the older developments, and not directly in the village center…most have been there for quite some time and have been a part of the mix… a far cry from Brookside.



> On Jul 24, 2020, at 3:00 PM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Sara Mattes wrote:
>
> 1. >While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.  That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.  West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.  All that has changed.  Is it for the better?  It depends on your goals.  If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.  If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
> ----------
>
> A quick Google search reveals that the new, "upscale" Prescott apartments available now in West Concord start at $2,202 for a 1 bedroom, and $2,361 for a 2 bedroom.  At the Wedgewood Common apartment building, which has been there since before the gentrification wave that Sara is bemoaning, an available 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  And Hawthorne Village, which appears to be of the same vintage as Wedgewood, a 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  https://www.apartments.com/the-prescott-at-concord-concord-ma/r66e0b3/  https://www.apartments.com/wedgewood-common-apartments-concord-ma/gk0z60z/   https://www.apartments.com/hawthorne-village-concord-ma/dccec4k/
>
> The median market rent for apartments in Concord is . . . $3,475.  https://www.concordma.gov/629/Affordable-Housing-Information
>
> Sara, you had been a very vocal proponent of the Oriole Landing development project, with the thrust of your messaging that Lincoln should approve that project so that we can avoid future high density housing (under 40B).  In essence, better to let THIS upscale, high density housing project into Lincoln, so that we don't have FUTURE high density housing.  And that because Lincoln would be at 14% affordable housing (as defined) with Oriole Landing, that is more than enough affordable housing in town.
>
> So...  which is it?  Should West Concord have built MORE of these new apartment buildings -- which are offered at rates BELOW the median market rent for Concord?  Or fewer?  Or should Concord choose a path, like what you advocated Lincoln should do -- permit JUST ENOUGH affordable housing to keep above the 10% threshold to avoid 40B?  Instead of permitting more apartment complexes at higher densities, thereby enabling those you feel should be entitled to live in Concord - school teachers and fire fighters?
>
> The solution is pretty simple, right?  Want more affordable housing?  Let developers build them.  One cannot logically want both affordable housing but also a limited stock and restrictions on density.
>
> Vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 2:21 PM
> To: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
> Subject: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.
>
> The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.
>
> The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
> How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
> How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
> How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
> How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
> And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
> Quintessential small town.
>
> Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
> I am so sad to think future generations will not.
>
>
> While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.
>
> That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
> West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
> All that has changed.
> Is it for the better?
> It depends on your goals.
> If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
> If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
> .
>
> We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.
>
>

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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Debra Daugherty
In reply to this post by Lincoln mailing list
Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

--Debra

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 
On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:


The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.



Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

samattes
I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.
This is to support small, preferably local businesses.
And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?
Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.
I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.
Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.
We wanted to remain “quiet.”
Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.
Don’t build.
But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.
But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.
Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?
And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?
And what about Something Special?

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.
We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.
Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.
As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.
Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.
It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.
And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

Sara







On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

--Debra

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 
On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:


The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.



Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Lincoln mailing list
In reply to this post by Debra Daugherty
It would never happen but there is a lot of traffic off of 117 to Trapelo Rd and Rt 2 but the traffic through town and at the intersection is bad enough as it is, especially during the school year. I am hoping Reel is able to make it through the shut down, something needs to keep that spot alive. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 05:19:13 PM EDT, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:


Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

--Debra

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 
On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:


The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.



Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

samattes
In reply to this post by Dennis Liu
Hmm…please cite the source-
"Sara, you had been a very vocal proponent of the Oriole Landing development project, with the thrust of your messaging that Lincoln should approve that project so that we can avoid future high density housing (under 40B). “

While I did offer some support in that it would work toward help avoid a 40B in the NEAR future, I would hardly call it being a “very vocal proponent.”
In fact, I expressed serious disappointment that some of the abutters concerns about traffic were not addressed, that I was not comfortable with the potential $$ impact on schools, that I believed the subsidy from the Housing Trust was excessive, and that we did not fully acknowledge the detrimental impact on the O’Brien family.   I believe I said I felt we had “thrown them under the bus.”

If you have something to demonstrate me as a “very vocal proponent,” please do.
I did, at one point say, it had the potential to be a good project, but that worked needed to be done…this was in a communication encouraging people to attend meetings, ask questions and make their voices heard.
If not, please do not mischaracterize what I would call “tepid support.”
I am pretty capable of generating enough words to come out of my mouth.
I don’t need you to add any!

All that said, I hope the project, as it opens,  brings happiness to our new neighbors.

Welcome to Lincoln!
Sara





On Jul 24, 2020, at 3:00 PM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sara Mattes wrote:

1. >While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.  That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.  West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.  All that has changed.  Is it for the better?  It depends on your goals.  If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.  If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
----------

A quick Google search reveals that the new, "upscale" Prescott apartments available now in West Concord start at $2,202 for a 1 bedroom, and $2,361 for a 2 bedroom.  At the Wedgewood Common apartment building, which has been there since before the gentrification wave that Sara is bemoaning, an available 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  And Hawthorne Village, which appears to be of the same vintage as Wedgewood, a 2 bedroom is . . . $2,300.  https://www.apartments.com/the-prescott-at-concord-concord-ma/r66e0b3/  https://www.apartments.com/wedgewood-common-apartments-concord-ma/gk0z60z/   https://www.apartments.com/hawthorne-village-concord-ma/dccec4k/

The median market rent for apartments in Concord is . . . $3,475.  https://www.concordma.gov/629/Affordable-Housing-Information

Sara, you had been a very vocal proponent of the Oriole Landing development project, with the thrust of your messaging that Lincoln should approve that project so that we can avoid future high density housing (under 40B).  In essence, better to let THIS upscale, high density housing project into Lincoln, so that we don't have FUTURE high density housing.  And that because Lincoln would be at 14% affordable housing (as defined) with Oriole Landing, that is more than enough affordable housing in town.

So...  which is it?  Should West Concord have built MORE of these new apartment buildings -- which are offered at rates BELOW the median market rent for Concord?  Or fewer?  Or should Concord choose a path, like what you advocated Lincoln should do -- permit JUST ENOUGH affordable housing to keep above the 10% threshold to avoid 40B?  Instead of permitting more apartment complexes at higher densities, thereby enabling those you feel should be entitled to live in Concord - school teachers and fire fighters?

The solution is pretty simple, right?  Want more affordable housing?  Let developers build them.  One cannot logically want both affordable housing but also a limited stock and restrictions on density.

Vty,

--Dennis


-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 2:21 PM
To: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.
How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?
How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?
How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?
How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?
And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!
Quintessential small town.

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.
I am so sad to think future generations will not.


While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.
West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.
All that has changed.
Is it for the better?
It depends on your goals.
If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.
If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.
.

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




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To post, send mail to [hidden email].
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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Dennis Liu
In reply to this post by samattes

Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Craig Sussman
Go big or go home I say. How about a recreational pot shop with an attached McDonald’s. Just thinking outside the box😁

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Margaret Olson
In reply to this post by Dennis Liu
Starbucks opens stores in locations with traffic counts of 25,000 per day. For reference, route 20 in Waltham at 95 has 27,000. The route 2 ramp at Lincoln Road has 4,000.


I will note that we do have chains: Donelans, the bank, several real estate agents are all chains. Concord also has a number of chains - Cafe Nero being the most recent. 

Margaret 

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 6:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

samattes
In reply to this post by Dennis Liu
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]>
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles..or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Lincoln mailing list

Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Lincoln mailing list
Great response Jeff.  Its not clear to me why everyone is willing to throw what we have in Lincoln - especially South Lincoln -  to the dogs.  

There is no town like us anywhere nearby - probably anywhere at all.   It is a beautiful pastoral place - and its Lincoln conservation lands and farms have been preserved and kept active with much effort.  

Too many town officials think developing around Lincoln Station is a good idea.    You are absolutely right - once this gets started the town will never be the same.   A different, urban, unconservation-minded group will move in and change the nature of everything in this town. 

This isn't conjecture.  I saw this happen in towns in another state where I was involved in planning.  

And the Rural Land Foundation, which has done so much to preserve conservation lands in Lincoln, is for some unfathomable reason pushing this luxury housing.  You won't find that in their recent literature, which just arrived in the mail.

Please, all of us who love this town, be aware of what is happening behind the scenes.

Mary Rosenfeld





On Sunday, July 26, 2020, 12:12:23 AM EDT, Jeffrey C. Mizrahi via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Bijoy Misra
Dear Conservationist friends,
We could be a minority!  I was called names when I objected arbitrary development
at Lincoln Station.   Hope some balanced thinking would eventually emerge!
Regards,
Bijoy

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:37 PM Mary Rosenfeld via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:
Great response Jeff.  Its not clear to me why everyone is willing to throw what we have in Lincoln - especially South Lincoln -  to the dogs.  

There is no town like us anywhere nearby - probably anywhere at all.   It is a beautiful pastoral place - and its Lincoln conservation lands and farms have been preserved and kept active with much effort.  

Too many town officials think developing around Lincoln Station is a good idea.    You are absolutely right - once this gets started the town will never be the same.   A different, urban, unconservation-minded group will move in and change the nature of everything in this town. 

This isn't conjecture.  I saw this happen in towns in another state where I was involved in planning.  

And the Rural Land Foundation, which has done so much to preserve conservation lands in Lincoln, is for some unfathomable reason pushing this luxury housing.  You won't find that in their recent literature, which just arrived in the mail.

Please, all of us who love this town, be aware of what is happening behind the scenes.

Mary Rosenfeld





On Sunday, July 26, 2020, 12:12:23 AM EDT, Jeffrey C. Mizrahi via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Diana Abrashkin
It goes without saying -- keep Lincoln cool and quiet and (if you will) boring -- where the only interesting things are the people and the birds and the plants and the denizens of the protected natural landscapes.

Way to go, di

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:47 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Conservationist friends,
We could be a minority!  I was called names when I objected arbitrary development
at Lincoln Station.   Hope some balanced thinking would eventually emerge!
Regards,
Bijoy

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:37 PM Mary Rosenfeld via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:
Great response Jeff.  Its not clear to me why everyone is willing to throw what we have in Lincoln - especially South Lincoln -  to the dogs.  

There is no town like us anywhere nearby - probably anywhere at all.   It is a beautiful pastoral place - and its Lincoln conservation lands and farms have been preserved and kept active with much effort.  

Too many town officials think developing around Lincoln Station is a good idea.    You are absolutely right - once this gets started the town will never be the same.   A different, urban, unconservation-minded group will move in and change the nature of everything in this town. 

This isn't conjecture.  I saw this happen in towns in another state where I was involved in planning.  

And the Rural Land Foundation, which has done so much to preserve conservation lands in Lincoln, is for some unfathomable reason pushing this luxury housing.  You won't find that in their recent literature, which just arrived in the mail.

Please, all of us who love this town, be aware of what is happening behind the scenes.

Mary Rosenfeld





On Sunday, July 26, 2020, 12:12:23 AM EDT, Jeffrey C. Mizrahi via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Bijoy Misra
I did objection to the comment that we need housing for scores of various people
who visit the town on service.  I said we need to integrate the town schools
before we may think of bringing young minority families to town.
It was unknown to me that the development process was well oiled by some interest groups.
Hopefully coordinated development may take place.  (they can shout and vote you out!)
Bijoy



On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 2:18 PM Diana Abrashkin <[hidden email]> wrote:
It goes without saying -- keep Lincoln cool and quiet and (if you will) boring -- where the only interesting things are the people and the birds and the plants and the denizens of the protected natural landscapes.

Way to go, di

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:47 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Conservationist friends,
We could be a minority!  I was called names when I objected arbitrary development
at Lincoln Station.   Hope some balanced thinking would eventually emerge!
Regards,
Bijoy

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:37 PM Mary Rosenfeld via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:
Great response Jeff.  Its not clear to me why everyone is willing to throw what we have in Lincoln - especially South Lincoln -  to the dogs.  

There is no town like us anywhere nearby - probably anywhere at all.   It is a beautiful pastoral place - and its Lincoln conservation lands and farms have been preserved and kept active with much effort.  

Too many town officials think developing around Lincoln Station is a good idea.    You are absolutely right - once this gets started the town will never be the same.   A different, urban, unconservation-minded group will move in and change the nature of everything in this town. 

This isn't conjecture.  I saw this happen in towns in another state where I was involved in planning.  

And the Rural Land Foundation, which has done so much to preserve conservation lands in Lincoln, is for some unfathomable reason pushing this luxury housing.  You won't find that in their recent literature, which just arrived in the mail.

Please, all of us who love this town, be aware of what is happening behind the scenes.

Mary Rosenfeld





On Sunday, July 26, 2020, 12:12:23 AM EDT, Jeffrey C. Mizrahi via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

Lincoln mailing list
In reply to this post by samattes

You all need to stop worrying  about our little enclave, Lincoln,  before you can blink the progressive s want to take away your property to build high density, low income housing.  It won't be long now. We need to share our hard work with others, so we can all thrive. Isn't that right? Wake up folks!!
Lynne




On Sunday, July 26, 2020 Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:

I did objection to the comment that we need housing for scores of various people
who visit the town on service.  I said we need to integrate the town schools
before we may think of bringing young minority families to town.
It was unknown to me that the development process was well oiled by some interest groups.
Hopefully coordinated development may take place.  (they can shout and vote you out!)
Bijoy



On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 2:18 PM Diana Abrashkin <[hidden email]> wrote:
It goes without saying -- keep Lincoln cool and quiet and (if you will) boring -- where the only interesting things are the people and the birds and the plants and the denizens of the protected natural landscapes.

Way to go, di

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:47 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Conservationist friends,
We could be a minority!  I was called names when I objected arbitrary development
at Lincoln Station.   Hope some balanced thinking would eventually emerge!
Regards,
Bijoy

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:37 PM Mary Rosenfeld via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:
Great response Jeff.  Its not clear to me why everyone is willing to throw what we have in Lincoln - especially South Lincoln -  to the dogs.  

There is no town like us anywhere nearby - probably anywhere at all.   It is a beautiful pastoral place - and its Lincoln conservation lands and farms have been preserved and kept active with much effort.  

Too many town officials think developing around Lincoln Station is a good idea.    You are absolutely right - once this gets started the town will never be the same.   A different, urban, unconservation-minded group will move in and change the nature of everything in this town. 

This isn't conjecture.  I saw this happen in towns in another state where I was involved in planning.  

And the Rural Land Foundation, which has done so much to preserve conservation lands in Lincoln, is for some unfathomable reason pushing this luxury housing.  You won't find that in their recent literature, which just arrived in the mail.

Please, all of us who love this town, be aware of what is happening behind the scenes.

Mary Rosenfeld





On Sunday, July 26, 2020, 12:12:23 AM EDT, Jeffrey C. Mizrahi via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

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Okay so I am all for protecting the land we have and ensuring that Lincoln has its roots intact which is secured by my understanding that there are restrictions on building in the town, so I think it is safe to say that  the conservation in the town are safe at this time. But what I wonder is is there people upset at the construction going on at the school? Trucks coming in and out, more traffic, and of course an increase in taxes. Because for the life of me I do not know how this town took so long to accept a plan to build a new school for our children, the future, which in turn helps your real estate value by a solid school system and updated buildings. Are the same people who are fighting "not in my back yard" also the ones who canceled a plan to build a new school with state assistance and now have to pay out of pocket to get it done? This is an honest question to those out there because I do remember a lot of push back on building a new school and would just love to now if this is the same group? 
On Monday, July 27, 2020, 07:34:26 AM EDT, Lynne LaSpina via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


You all need to stop worrying  about our little enclave, Lincoln,  before you can blink the progressive s want to take away your property to build high density, low income housing.  It won't be long now. We need to share our hard work with others, so we can all thrive. Isn't that right? Wake up folks!!
Lynne


On Sunday, July 26, 2020 Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
I did objection to the comment that we need housing for scores of various people
who visit the town on service.  I said we need to integrate the town schools
before we may think of bringing young minority families to town.
It was unknown to me that the development process was well oiled by some interest groups.
Hopefully coordinated development may take place.  (they can shout and vote you out!)
Bijoy



On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 2:18 PM Diana Abrashkin <[hidden email]> wrote:
It goes without saying -- keep Lincoln cool and quiet and (if you will) boring -- where the only interesting things are the people and the birds and the plants and the denizens of the protected natural landscapes.

Way to go, di

Diana Abrashkin, Registered Architect
www.CuracaoWithDiana.com
www.ADCarchitecture.com
US telephone (781) 259-0203


On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:47 PM Bijoy Misra <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Conservationist friends,
We could be a minority!  I was called names when I objected arbitrary development
at Lincoln Station.   Hope some balanced thinking would eventually emerge!
Regards,
Bijoy

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 1:37 PM Mary Rosenfeld via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:
Great response Jeff.  Its not clear to me why everyone is willing to throw what we have in Lincoln - especially South Lincoln -  to the dogs.  

There is no town like us anywhere nearby - probably anywhere at all.   It is a beautiful pastoral place - and its Lincoln conservation lands and farms have been preserved and kept active with much effort.  

Too many town officials think developing around Lincoln Station is a good idea.    You are absolutely right - once this gets started the town will never be the same.   A different, urban, unconservation-minded group will move in and change the nature of everything in this town. 

This isn't conjecture.  I saw this happen in towns in another state where I was involved in planning.  

And the Rural Land Foundation, which has done so much to preserve conservation lands in Lincoln, is for some unfathomable reason pushing this luxury housing.  You won't find that in their recent literature, which just arrived in the mail.

Please, all of us who love this town, be aware of what is happening behind the scenes.

Mary Rosenfeld





On Sunday, July 26, 2020, 12:12:23 AM EDT, Jeffrey C. Mizrahi via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:


Sorry folks, I must make a post on this!  First, Lincoln is not Concord, nor Lexington, Sudbury or Wayland for that matter.  It's a small gorgeous hammock with a completely different pastoral environment than all the others.  I can't imagine why anyone already living here would want a Starbucks, let alone Traders or Whole Foods!  The fabric of the town would change on a dime and make it as homogeneous as everywhere else.  Is that what residents want?  I can tell you emphatically, that I personally do not.  I've seen many posts in recent weeks about small businesses folding in Concord due to Covid-19, and that's VERY unfortunate.  Although the numbers are smaller, that's exactly what will happen in Lincoln by promoting commercial chains here.  Twisted Tree will be gone within a week if Starbucks were to open in Lincoln.  Not to mention increased traffic and parking issues.  Then what?  Four-laneing Lincoln Road?  Is that what residents want?  I say NO.  It also begs the question who will pay for the increased cost for infrastructure?  The answer, the property owners will.  Which current businesses are currently hurting at present?  Is it indeed related to Covid-19, if they are? How is it any different than most other communities right now?  Support our local merchants and ride out the storm.  Last question, whom is behind this idea of bringing in a Starbucks?  Frankly, I think it's absurd, and absolutely unnecessary.  I'd like an honest answer, if anyone knows.

Thank you,
Jeff               

On 7/25/2020 10:49 PM, Sara Mattes wrote:
Margaret has made the point...and the same reason Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods would entertain locating here...bylaw or no bylaw.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:38 PM, Dennis Liu [hidden email] wrote:



Debra Daugherty wrote:  >Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

Sara Mattes responded:  >I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.  This is to support small, preferably local businesses.  And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?  Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

----------

 

It should probably be self-evident by virtue of the fact that Starbucks is the largest coffee shop chain in the world, with 45,000 locations world-wide, of which 15,000 are in the US, that yes, Starbucks would likely bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree.

 

Disclaimer:  I never ever go to Starbucks, because I don’t drink coffee (or tea, nor do I eat pastries), so I have no dog in this fight.  And I’ll add that I almost always patronize local restaurants, and rarely national chain eateries (well, I do not frequently stop at Popeyes).

 

I’m merely pointing out the fact that the reason Starbucks has 15,000 locations in the US, often replacing local, independent shops, is because people vote with their wallets

 

You may not like it; I may not like it; but the MILLIONS of patrons of Starbucks prefer going there versus an independent shop – evidenced 15k times.  So, yes, if Starbucks did decide that it could profitably open a location in  Lincoln, and assuming that it were permitted to so do (LOLOLOLOL), then it would absolutely bring more foot traffic into that area.

 

Vty,

 

--Dennis

 

 

 

From: Lincoln [hidden email] On Behalf Of Sara Mattes
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:54 PM
To: Debra Daugherty [hidden email]
Cc: Joanna Owen Schmergel via Lincoln [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] And, another one bites the dust...another steps in.

 

I believe that Lincoln has a bylaw to prohibit chains, as does Concord.

This is to support small, preferably local businesses.

And if we didn’t, if we could have a Starbucks, why would a Starbucks bring more foot traffic than Twisted Tree?

Would people leave Rt.2 or 117 or 126 or Rt.2A to come into town for our Starbucks?

 

Back in the dinosaur days, and I was a newbie in town, the hot debate was to build the Mall...or not.

I was all for going forward-leaping into the “modern age” of retail for our hamlet.

Some old timers said we would never have enough local traffic to support it, and that we didn’t necessarily want out -of—town traffic.

We wanted to remain “quiet.”

Others said, we did not need to worry about those out-of-towners…who had better choices elsewhere, so why build here…no traffic, no trade, no business for the Mall.

Don’t build.

But, the pro-build folks, me included, believed in “build it and they will come.”

 

Well, guess what, fast forward to today-we built it, and they did not come, at least in droves.

But, somehow, a few businesses manage to hang in there.

Wasn’t Whistle Stop here for over 10+ years?

And Donelan’s and Country Pizza, haven’t they been around at least that long?

And what about Something Special?

 

Several years back, studies (costing us a pretty penny) were done to see what kinds of businesses we could support.

We were told by not just one consultant that we had about what we could support.

Whole Foods, traders Joes were not interested.

As wonderful a town as we were/are, they were not interested.

 

We were told we could not build enough of anything to bring enough traffic to support more than we had, and even more density would not necessarily guarantee the survival of what we have today.

 

So, maybe those old-timers, those dinosaurs were right.

Maybe we had stasis then and now we are pushing our luck.

 

Surely we will conduct more studies and have more debate.

It’s important not to be hobbled by the past, but to learn from it, as we move forward.

And, maybe we can look at what is happening to our neighbors and see if that offers examples of how we choose to evolve…or remain the same.

 

Sara

 

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 24, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Debra Daugherty <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Would a Starbucks want to establish itself in Lincoln? I'm guessing they'd take a pass on that ... I wouldn't be against one being here though. I agree with your idea that it would generate foot traffic. (I prefer Pete's though ....)

 

--Debra

 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 2:47 PM john gregg via Lincoln <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

Not for nothing but put a Starbucks in Lincoln Center and you see other businesses reap the rewards of foot traffic. I prefer small businesses and I go no further than Something Special to get birthday presents when possible, dry cleaning, and visit Reel. So I love the small town feeling and vibe but when it comes to sustainability landlords need to pay the rent thus the turnover at Lincoln Station for restaurants. 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 02:20:42 PM EDT, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

The loss of the Five & Dime was inevitable, with the changing face (and rising rents ) of West Concord.

 

The Five & Dime was where you could get anything, truly anything.

How many Lincoln 4th of July floats were constructed from materials obtained on a last minute run to the 5&10?

How many kids, like mine, were given a few dollars, or quarters, and left alone to shop…learning to budget and make change and thrilled with the odd things in the kids aisles.or at the candy counter?

How many Lincoln screens were repaired in the back of the store?

How many  found just the right color thread, or needle, or scarp of fabric, esp. felt, for that sewing project?

And party supplies and prizes…yup, there they were!

Quintessential small town.

 

Scoot in, scoot out-floors creaking, the odd ramp up to the back part of the building….I am so glad my kids had these wonderful experiences when they were growing up.

I am so sad to think future generations will not.

 

 

While Debra’s is a fine shop, locally owned and offering great produce, it is definitely serving an elite niche…a niche that now lives in all those apartments in West Concord….hardly affordable or middle income housing.

 

That niche has dramatically changed the look, feel, and housing prices of West Concord, driving out many long-time residents as taxes rise.

West Concord used to be the “affordable side of town”-the one where the school teachers and fire fighters could afford to live.

All that has changed.

Is it for the better?

It depends on your goals.

If you believe a “vibrant village center” is made up of high-end stores and restaurants id the goal then mission accomplished.

If your goal is maintain economic diversity, not so much.

.

 

We need to keep this in mind as we look at our own town, and question what is means to have a “vibrant village center” and ask ourselves what might  be the social cost.




Sara











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