[LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

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[LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Dennis Liu

Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including rescheduling games and events. 

Query – is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?  Since Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we should be doing *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right? 

It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly and children.

>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease. Death usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.

https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-condition-eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass

vty,

--Dennis


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

John F. Carr
The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England
is not a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year
statewide, let's say about a one in a million chance for people who
live near mosquito habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July,
the mosquitoes of September find many breeding places in the woods of
Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a
million chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years
to one case per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented measures
> to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including rescheduling games and
> events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with survivors
> often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly and
> children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease. Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and progressive
> mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal brain
> dysfunction
> to severe intellectual impairment, personality disorders, seizures,
> paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many patients with severe
> sequelae
> die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-condition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

samattes
"How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a
million chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years
to one case per ten thousand years?”

Not to mention the potential side-effects of whatever is sprayed…..


On Sep 7, 2019, at 2:10 PM, John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England
is not a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year
statewide, let's say about a one in a million chance for people who
live near mosquito habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July,
the mosquitoes of September find many breeding places in the woods of
Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a
million chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years
to one case per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented measures
to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including rescheduling games and
events.

Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
Since
Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with survivors
often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we should be doing
*everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?

It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly and
children.

Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease. Death
usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and progressive
mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal brain
dysfunction
to severe intellectual impairment, personality disorders, seizures,
paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many patients with severe
sequelae
die within a few years.

https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-condition
-eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass

vty,

--Dennis


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Dennis Liu
In reply to this post by John F. Carr
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html

vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Richard Panetta
In reply to this post by samattes
There are all natural safe products out there they kill mosquitoes. You do not need the synthetic chemicals for it. 

Is your life or a loved ones worth the cost. That is the question   

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:13 PM Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:
"How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a
million chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years
to one case per ten thousand years?”

Not to mention the potential side-effects of whatever is sprayed…..


On Sep 7, 2019, at 2:10 PM, John F. Carr <[hidden email]> wrote:

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England
is not a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year
statewide, let's say about a one in a million chance for people who
live near mosquito habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July,
the mosquitoes of September find many breeding places in the woods of
Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a
million chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years
to one case per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented measures
to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including rescheduling games and
events.

Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
Since
Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with survivors
often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we should be doing
*everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?

It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly and
children.

Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease. Death
usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and progressive
mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal brain
dysfunction
to severe intellectual impairment, personality disorders, seizures,
paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many patients with severe
sequelae
die within a few years.

https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-condition
-eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass

vty,

--Dennis


--
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Change your subscription settings at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/lincoln.


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Kathryn Anagnostakis
In reply to this post by Dennis Liu
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410



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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Margaret Olson
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


--
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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Richard Panetta
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Margaret Olson
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Richard Panetta
I use one at my home and have seen an increase in pollinators and still have bats flying overhead at dusk.

It has been used by several bee keepers for years without any harm to the hives.

It has rosemary in it which disrupts their brain from producing octopimine, paralyzing them them killing them.  

Perfectly safe for other animals

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Dennis Liu
In reply to this post by Margaret Olson

Folks, let’s remember we are talking about a life-altering, potentially fatal disease here.  Sudbury has 18k residents.  At least one person has been diagnosed with it, and is in critical condition.  Other victims are in nearby towns.  It’s clear that mosquitoes with EEE are nearby. 

 

A risk of 1-in-18k is pretty damn high; that’s way, way, way higher than many causes of death that we take far more seriously.

 

Quite frankly, I don’t really care about the risk to pollinators or bats and birds, regardless of whether those risks are real or highly exaggerated. 

 

Why?  To be clear, we’re not talking about widespread spraying of the entire country.  We’re not talking about widespread spraying across New England.  We’re not even talking about widespread spraying across all of Massachusetts.

 

*** We’re talking about spraying in an area where EEE-infected mosquitoes have been found ***

 

I’m perfectly happy living with a reduced population of local bees, or bats, or birds, if it means AVOIDING HAVING CHILDREN DIE.

 

Yes, I always point out, look at the statistics.  And I live a mostly-care-free life, free from the abstract fears of minute risks that seemingly strike many of my middle-aged friends.

 

Here, however, the statistics point out that the risk of catching EEE ***in LINCOLN*** are much higher than risks of dying from other, serious causes. 

 

Question – if instead of a 5-year old in Sudbury, it had been a 5-year old in Lincoln.  Would anyone here still prioritize the potential risk to other insects, or animals that eat insects?  HOW BAD WOULD EEE HAVE TO GET, in order for you to say, “yes, we should try to eliminate reservoirs of EEE infected mosquitoes in our town?”  Would 3 victims do it?  What about 7?  Is there any number that would convince you?

 

--Dennis

 

 

From: Margaret Olson <[hidden email]>
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 3:31 PM
To: Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]>
Cc: Dennis Liu <[hidden email]>; Listserv, Listserv <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

 

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.

 

 

 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:

I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

 

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:


> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

 

Sincerely,

Kathryn Anagnostakis

617.794.0410

 

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

samattes
In reply to this post by Kathryn Anagnostakis
Purely anecdotal:
As we have had multiple cases of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases at this address, in humans horses and dogs, we have been spraying for years.
We have used “Pure Solutions” -natural products.
While we still have had the occasional tick illness -which may or may not have been from a tick on our property-we have noticed a dramatic drop in the number we see/that our dog brings in.
We also have noticed a dramatic drop in mosquitos.

At the same time, we enjoy lots of birds at our feeders, and lots of pollinators in various shrubs.
We don’t see bats, but rarely have.

Again, this is purely anecdotal.

Given the reports of the nearby infections, I wonder if Lincoln has been testing.
I may have missed that in the thread.

In the meantime, perhaps, if you re concerned, you may want to check out these “natural” alternative, like the ones Pure Solutions offers.

Sara






On Sep 7, 2019, at 2:51 PM, Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:

I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Margaret Olson
In reply to this post by Richard Panetta
What exactly is it? I would like to know, if it as you say I’ll use it

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:59 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
I use one at my home and have seen an increase in pollinators and still have bats flying overhead at dusk.

It has been used by several bee keepers for years without any harm to the hives.

It has rosemary in it which disrupts their brain from producing octopimine, paralyzing them them killing them.  

Perfectly safe for other animals

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

samattes
Go to their website and check it out.
As far as I know, it’s a cocktail, of sorts.
Give them a call and ask.
Best,
Sara

On Sep 7, 2019, at 5:36 PM, Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:

What exactly is it? I would like to know, if it as you say I’ll use it

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:59 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
I use one at my home and have seen an increase in pollinators and still have bats flying overhead at dusk.

It has been used by several bee keepers for years without any harm to the hives.

It has rosemary in it which disrupts their brain from producing octopimine, paralyzing them them killing them.  

Perfectly safe for other animals

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Taylor, Gary
In reply to this post by Kathryn Anagnostakis

All,

 

I am not aware that Lincoln has ever sprayed for mosquitoes.  However, in the early nineties, the Town made available to residents a pelletized bacterial agent, BTI, that spread in still water that might be mosquito breeding grounds, killed the larvae before they matured.  It seems that it is still available – targets only mosquitoes as they develop.  May not be helpful where mosquitoes have already matured, but, perhaps a longer-term solution.  FWIW:

 

The most effective biolarvicide for mosquito control on the market!

Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) has been used for decades by backyard gardeners and commercial growers to control mosquitoes, fungus gnats and black fly. A bio-rational control, Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is naturally present in the environment and controls the larval stage of certain Dipterans – the aforementioned mosquitoes, fungus gnats, and black fly. It is target specific, rivals S-methoprene in efficacy and is safe for use around mammals, birds, fish and amphibians – keystone species within an ecosystem.

See:  https://www.arbico-organics.com/category/bti-bacillus-thurengiensis-israelensis?gclid=Cj0KCQjwqs3rBRCdARIsADe1pfRI90KCDbWRYtvcbgUr6i4_qAy5Ckbpd7UUCwZTG4EDElje8o9SSpgaAiCfEALw_wcB

 

 

From: Lincoln [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Kathryn Anagnostakis
Sent: Saturday, September 07, 2019 2:52 PM
To: Dennis Liu
Cc: Listserv, Listserv
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

 

I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

 

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:

John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
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--

 

Sincerely,

Kathryn Anagnostakis

617.794.0410

 

 

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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Andrew Payne
Gary wrote:

The most effective biolarvicide for mosquito control on the market!

Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) has been used for decades by backyard gardeners and commercial growers to control mosquitoes, fungus gnats and black fly. A bio-rational control, Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is naturally present in the environment and controls the larval stage of certain Dipterans – the aforementioned mosquitoes, fungus gnats, and black fly. It is target specific, rivals S-methoprene in efficacy and is safe for use around mammals, birds, fish and amphibians – keystone species within an ecosystem.


Available & in stock at Home Depot (well, at least usually -- maybe not so much after this news), in "dunk" form:  https://www.homedepot.com/p/Summit-12-in-Mosquito-Dunks-6-Pack-110-12/100334779

And in bulk pellets from Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Summit-responsible-solutions-119-1-Mosquito/dp/B003XS2572 . (and many other sources online)

As Gary mentioned, these are tossed/spread into standing water.

-andy


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Margaret Olson
In reply to this post by Margaret Olson
For those of you curious, Pure Solutions offers progaea, which (after a fair amount of digging) I discovered is a mix of rosemary oil and peppermint oil, with spearmint and mineral oils. Spearmint and peppermint oils are recommended for bee hives to kill mites. Rosemary oil seems to be neutral. Spearmint oil can be dangerous for very young children, but it's not clear to me that that's a realistic risk if progaea is applied according to the instructions. The data sheet: http://cru66.cahe.wsu.edu/~picol/pdf/WA/63349.pdf

As Gary Taylor points out, BT will prevent mosquitos from hatching. Even more effective: drain all stagnant water. Particularly be careful of partially full watering cans.

Margaret

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Ruth Ann Hendrickson
I followed the link to read the data sheet and it says it can be used to control bees and wasps, so I wouldn’t be so sure that it wouldn’t harm pollinators.

Ruth Ann

On Sep 7, 2019, at 6:01 PM, Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:

For those of you curious, Pure Solutions offers progaea, which (after a fair amount of digging) I discovered is a mix of rosemary oil and peppermint oil, with spearmint and mineral oils. Spearmint and peppermint oils are recommended for bee hives to kill mites. Rosemary oil seems to be neutral. Spearmint oil can be dangerous for very young children, but it's not clear to me that that's a realistic risk if progaea is applied according to the instructions. The data sheet: http://cru66.cahe.wsu.edu/~picol/pdf/WA/63349.pdf

As Gary Taylor points out, BT will prevent mosquitos from hatching. Even more effective: drain all stagnant water. Particularly be careful of partially full watering cans.

Margaret

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

samattes
Sure hasn’t hurt mine.   And the shrubs they swarm are sprayed every 21 days 

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 7, 2019, at 7:46 PM, RAandBOB <[hidden email]> wrote:

I followed the link to read the data sheet and it says it can be used to control bees and wasps, so I wouldn’t be so sure that it wouldn’t harm pollinators.

Ruth Ann

On Sep 7, 2019, at 6:01 PM, Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:

For those of you curious, Pure Solutions offers progaea, which (after a fair amount of digging) I discovered is a mix of rosemary oil and peppermint oil, with spearmint and mineral oils. Spearmint and peppermint oils are recommended for bee hives to kill mites. Rosemary oil seems to be neutral. Spearmint oil can be dangerous for very young children, but it's not clear to me that that's a realistic risk if progaea is applied according to the instructions. The data sheet: http://cru66.cahe.wsu.edu/~picol/pdf/WA/63349.pdf

As Gary Taylor points out, BT will prevent mosquitos from hatching. Even more effective: drain all stagnant water. Particularly be careful of partially full watering cans.

Margaret

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


--
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Reply | Threaded
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Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

Ruth Ann Hendrickson
Good to know

Ruth Ann

On Sep 7, 2019, at 8:41 PM, Sara Mattes <[hidden email]> wrote:

Sure hasn’t hurt mine.   And the shrubs they swarm are sprayed every 21 days 

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 7, 2019, at 7:46 PM, RAandBOB <[hidden email]> wrote:

I followed the link to read the data sheet and it says it can be used to control bees and wasps, so I wouldn’t be so sure that it wouldn’t harm pollinators.

Ruth Ann

On Sep 7, 2019, at 6:01 PM, Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:

For those of you curious, Pure Solutions offers progaea, which (after a fair amount of digging) I discovered is a mix of rosemary oil and peppermint oil, with spearmint and mineral oils. Spearmint and peppermint oils are recommended for bee hives to kill mites. Rosemary oil seems to be neutral. Spearmint oil can be dangerous for very young children, but it's not clear to me that that's a realistic risk if progaea is applied according to the instructions. The data sheet: http://cru66.cahe.wsu.edu/~picol/pdf/WA/63349.pdf

As Gary Taylor points out, BT will prevent mosquitos from hatching. Even more effective: drain all stagnant water. Particularly be careful of partially full watering cans.

Margaret

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:43 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
What all natural product kills only mosquitos? I know of none, I googled and found none. Permethrins are natural yes, and highly toxic to bees as well a mosquitos (and probably many other insects)

“Natural” does not mean non-toxic. It means some plant or animal makes it.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:37 PM Richard Panetta <[hidden email]> wrote:
Margaret,

That is false. There are all natural products out there that do not affect beneficial insects.

The synthetic chemicals do. But not all natural products 

Rich 

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 3:31 PM Margaret Olson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Bees are not the only pollinators nor are they the only beneficial insects. Spraying for mosquitos is harmful to the bats and to the birds and many other animals that eat mosquitos and other insects. I am dubious of the claim that they are not harmful to bees as I have read  that they very much are.

If you are concerned wear insect repellant. If you are concerned about the health effects of insect repellents you certainly do not want generalized spraying.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:52 PM Kathryn Anagnostakis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I wasn't aware that Lincoln sprayed for mosquitoes ever.  What would get sprayed and does it kill bees too?  

On a truly local level, I have been considering spraying my yard but am leery of the "it doesn't hurt the bees" protestations of many mosquito squad type businesses.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
John -- I am in partial agreement with your statement, but only in the macro
sense.  Fully agreed, malaria is a far more serious disease; indeed, a
recent book discusses how mosquitoes (carrying malaria) have killed more
human beings than any other source in all of history.  It's still a scourge
today, with hundreds of thousands of deaths, many of which would have been
avoidable but for the unintended consequences of Rachel Carson and the green
movement.

I take exception, however, when your broader statement is applied in the
local sense.

Analogy:  the risk of dying from a shark attack, nationally, is laughably
low.  Far, far, far less than dying in a plane crash or even being hit by
lightning.  The "per capita fatality rate" for shark attacks is very, very,
very low.

However:  because the per capita rate is measured across a broad population,
by definition, the per capita rate of death by shark attack measures
everyone living in Chicago too.  If you reduce the population size down to
only those living in coastal states, the per capita rate skyrockets --
though still ridiculously low!

But then you reduce the population being measured down to only those who
actually go swimming in the ocean, and the rate goes up by orders of
magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But then you reduce it again to those who actually go swimming at beaches
in, say, Florida, Hawaii and California, and the rate goes up again by
orders of magnitude - though still ridiculously low.

But let's say that we reduce it again to those beaches where sharks are
actually SPOTTED OFFSHORE; surely you'd agree that the risk of dying by
shark attack is . . . something worth staying out of the water for?

Thus the similarity with EEE.  We are in the middle of a 2-3 year cycle
where EEE infections will persist.  I am by no means advocating for national
spraying for mosquitoes to fight EEE, or even statewide spraying.  But in
*communities where EEE has been detected*?  ABSOLUTELY.

Keep in mind that spraying for mosquitoes also fights the risk of west nile
virus, as well as the generally annoyance of being bitten by a mosquito.
The cost for a town, like Lincoln, to spray, is minimal, taken in the
cost/benefit analysis of prevention of EEE, given that we have evidence of
an outbreak next door in Sudbury.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/08/27/communities-critical-risk-for-e
ee-cases-rare-but-deadly-mosquito-borne-virus-climb-mass/uf2BU6HzXCEvGb4UK3b
xyK/story.html


vty,

--Dennis




-----Original Message-----
From: Lincoln <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of John F. Carr
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:10 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [LincolnTalk] 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl In Critical Condition
After Testing Positive For EEE Virus | CommonHealth

The case fatality rate of EEE is not as important as the per capita
fatality rate.   Malaria is a more serious disease globally despite
the small chance of death per infection, while rabies in New England is not
a serious disease despite the very high chance of death.

The long term average rate of EEE cases is about one per year statewide,
let's say about a one in a million chance for people who live near mosquito
habitat.  That's us.  Like the deer flies of July, the mosquitoes of
September find many breeding places in the woods of Lincoln.

How much money are you willing to spend to reduce that one in a million
chance to one in ten million, from one case per thousand years to one case
per ten thousand years?


On 9/7/19, Dennis Liu <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Tragic news.  Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School has implemented
> measures to limit outdoor exposure to mosquitoes, including
> rescheduling games and events.
>
> Query - is Lincoln spraying for mosquitoes as thoroughly as it could?
> Since
> Eastern Equine Encephalitis is FATAL in ~1/3rd of all cases, with
> survivors often experiencing life-long, traumatic symptoms, surely we
> should be doing
> *everything* to eradicate mosquitoes, right?
>
> It's literally a risk of flying death, particularly for the elderly
> and children.
>
>>Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease.
>>Death
> usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much
> later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and
> progressive mental and physical sequelae, which can range from minimal
> brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality
> disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many
> patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.
>
> https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/09/07/sudbury-girl-critical-con
> dition
> -eastern-equine-encephalitis-mass
>
> vty,
>
> --Dennis
>
>
--
The LincolnTalk mailing list.
To post, send mail to [hidden email].
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Browse the archives at https://pairlist9.pair.net/mailman/private/lincoln/.
Change your subscription settings at
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--

Sincerely,
Kathryn Anagnostakis
617.794.0410


--
The LincolnTalk mailing list.
To post, send mail to [hidden email].
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